Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for Injection (Mylotarg)
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Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for Injection (Mylotarg)

Mylotarg®
(gemtuzumab ozogamicin for) Injection

for intravenous use only

This product's label may have been revised after this insert was used in production. For further product information and current package insert, please visit www.wyeth.com or call our medical communications department toll-free at 1-800-934-5556.

WARNINGS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should be administered under the supervision of physicians experienced in the treatment of acute leukemia and in facilities equipped to monitor and treat leukemia patients.

There are no controlled trials demonstrating efficacy and safety using Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should only be used as single agent chemotherapy and not in combination chemotherapy regimens outside clinical trials.

Severe myelosuppression occurs when Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is used at recommended doses.

HYPERSENSITIVITY REACTIONS INCLUDING ANAPHYLAXIS, INFUSION REACTIONS, PULMONARY EVENTS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) administration can result in severe hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis), and other infusion-related reactions which may include severe pulmonary events. Infrequently, hypersensitivity reactions and pulmonary events have been fatal. In most cases, infusion-related symptoms occurred during the infusion or within 24 hours of administration of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) and resolved. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) infusion should be interrupted for patients experiencing dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension. Patients should be monitored until signs and symptoms completely resolve. Discontinuation of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) treatment should be strongly considered for patients who develop anaphylaxis, pulmonary edema, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Since patients with high peripheral blast counts may be at greater risk for pulmonary events and tumor lysis syndrome, physicians should consider leukoreduction with hydroxyurea or leukapheresis to reduce the peripheral white count to below 30,000/µL prior to administration of Mylotarg. (See WARNINGS.)

HEPATOTOXICITY

Hepatotoxicity, including severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), has been reported in association with the use of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) as a single agent, as part of a combination chemotherapy regimen, and in patients without a history of liver disease or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Patients who receive Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) either before or after HSCT, patients with underlying hepatic disease or abnormal liver function, and patients receiving Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combinations with other chemotherapy are at increased risk for developing VOD, including severe VOD. Death from liver failure and from VOD has been reported in patients who received Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Physicians should monitor their patients carefully for symptoms of hepatotoxicity, particularly VOD. These symptoms can include: rapid weight gain, right upper quadrant pain, hepatomegaly, ascites, elevations in bilirubin and/or liver enzymes. However, careful monitoring may not identify all patients at risk or prevent the complications of hepatotoxicity. (See WARNINGS and ADVERSE REACTIONS sections.)

DRUG DESCRIPTION

Mylotarg® (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for Injection) is a chemotherapy agent composed of a recombinant humanized IgG4, kappa antibody conjugated with a cytotoxic antitumor antibiotic, calicheamicin, isolated from fermentation of a bacterium, Micromonospora echinospora subsp. calichensis. The antibody portion of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) binds specifically to the CD33 antigen, a sialic acid-dependent adhesion protein found on the surface of leukemic blasts and immature normal cells of myelomonocytic lineage, but not on normal hematopoietic stem cells.

Mylotarg® (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) Structural Formula Illustration

The anti-CD33 hP67.6 antibody is produced by mammalian cell suspension culture using a myeloma NS0 cell line and is purified under conditions which remove or inactivate viruses. Three separate and independent steps in the hP67.6 antibody purification process achieves retrovirus inactivation and removal. These include low pH treatment, DEAE-Sepharose chromatography, and viral filtration. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) contains amino acid sequences of which approximately 98.3% are of human origin. The constant region and framework regions contain human sequences while the complementarity-determining regions are derived from a murine antibody (p67.6) that binds CD33. This antibody is linked to N-acetyl-gamma calicheamicin via a bifunctional linker. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has approximately 50% of the antibody loaded with 4-6 moles calicheamicin per mole of antibody. The remaining 50% of the antibody is not linked to the calicheamicin derivative. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has a molecular weight of 151 to 153 kDa.

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is a sterile, white, preservative-free lyophilized powder containing 5 mg of drug conjugate (protein equivalent) in an amber vial. The drug product is light sensitive and must be protected from direct and indirect sunlight and unshielded fluorescent light during the preparation and administration of the infusion. The inactive ingredients are: dextran 40; sucrose; sodium chloride; monobasic and dibasic sodium phosphate.

What are the possible side effects of gemtuzumab (Mylotarg)?

Some people receiving a gemtuzumab injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you feel dizzy, nauseated, light-headed, sweaty, or have fever, chills, or trouble breathing within 24 hours after receiving the injection.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • pain in your upper right stomach, loss...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Mylotarg »

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

INDICATIONS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is indicated for the treatment of patients with CD33 positive acute myeloid leukemia in first relapse who are 60 years of age or older and who are not considered candidates for other cytotoxic chemotherapy. The safety and efficacy of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in patients with poor performance status and organ dysfunction has not been established.

The effectiveness of Mylotarg is based on OR rates (see Clinical Studies section). There are no controlled trials demonstrating a clinical benefit, such as improvement in disease-related symptoms or increased survival, compared to any other treatment.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

The recommended dose of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is 9 mg/m² , infused over a 2-hour period. Physicians should consider leukoreduction with hydroxyurea or leukapheresis to reduce the peripheral white blood count to below 30,000/μL prior to administration of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Appropriate measures (e.g. hydration and allopurinol) must be taken to prevent hyperuricemia. Patients should receive the following prophylactic medications one hour before Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) administration: diphenhydramine 50 mg po and acetaminophen 650-1000 mg po; thereafter, two additional doses of acetaminophen 650-1000 mg po, one every 4 hours as needed. Vital signs should be monitored during infusion and for four hours following infusion. The recommended treatment course with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is a total of 2 doses with 14 days between the doses. Full recovery from hematologic toxicities is not a requirement for administration of the second dose.

Methylprednisolone given prior to Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) infusion may ameliorate infusion-related symptoms.

Hepatic Insufficiency: Patients with hepatic impairment were not included in the clinical studies. (See WARNINGS section).

Renal Insufficiency: Patients with renal impairment were not included in the clinical studies.

Instructions for Reconstitution

The drug product is light sensitive and must be protected from direct and indirect sunlight and unshielded fluorescent light during the preparation and administration of the infusion. All preparation should take place in a biologic safety hood with shielded fluorescent light. Reconstitute the contents of each vial with 5 mL Sterile Water for Injection, USP, using sterile syringes. Gently swirl each vial. Each vial should be inspected for complete dissolution of the drug. The final concentration of the reconstituted drug solution is 1 mg/mL. See Table 11 for storage conditions for reconstituted product.

Instructions for Dilution

Prepare an admixture corresponding to 9 mg/m² dose of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) by injecting the reconstituted solution into a 100 mL 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution in either a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or ethylene/polypropylene copolymer (non-PVC) IV bag covered by an ultraviolet (UV) light protector. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should only be diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride solution. DO NOT DILUTE WITH ANY OTHER ELECTROLYTE SOLUTIONS or 5% DEXTROSE or MIX WITH OTHER DRUGS. See Table 11 for storage conditions for diluted product.

The drug solution in the vial, transfer syringe, or the IV bag may appear hazy due to normal light scattering from the protein.

Administration

DO NOT ADMINISTER AS AN INTRAVENOUS (IV) PUSH OR BOLUS

Once the reconstituted Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is diluted into the IV bag containing normal saline, the resulting solution should be infused over a 2-hour period. See Table 11 for infusion times. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) may be given peripherally or through a central line. During the infusion, only the IV bag needs to be protected from light. An in-line, low protein binding filter must be used for the infusion of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . The following filter membranes are qualified: 0.22 μm or 1.2 μm polyether sulfone (PES) (Supor®); 1.2 μm acrylic copolymer hydrophilic filter (Versapor®); 0.8 μm cellulose mixed ester (acetate and nitrate) membrane; 0.2 μm cellulose acetate membrane. DO NOT CO-ADMINISTER OTHER DRUGS THROUGH THE SAME INFUSION LINE. Premedication, consisting of acetaminophen and diphenhydramine, should be given before each infusion to reduce the incidence of a post-infusion symptom complex (see ADVERSE REACTIONS, Acute Infusion-Related Events).

Stability and Storage

Prior to Reconstitution: Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should be stored refrigerated 2° to 8° C (36° to 46° F) and protected from light.

After Reconstitution: Follow the instructions for reconstitution, dilution, and administration in the section above. See Table 11 below for reconstitution, dilution, and administration storage conditions and time intervals.

TABLE 11: STORAGE CONDITION AND TIME FOR RECONSTITUTION, DILUTION, AND ADMINISTRATION

The following time intervals for reconstitution, dilution, and administration should be followed for storage of the reconstituted solution.
Time Intervals Total Maximum Hours a
Reconstitution Dilution Administration
≤ 2 hours at room temperature or refrigeration ≤ 16 hours at room temperature 2 hour infusion 20
a: Total maximum time allowed for the storage of the reconstituted and diluted solutions and completion of infusion.

Instructions for Use, Handling and for Disposal: Individuals who have contact with anticancer drugs or work in areas where these drugs are used may be exposed to these agents through direct contact with contaminated objects.1 Potential health effects may be reduced by adherence to institutional procedures, published guidelines and local regulations for preparation, administration, transportation and disposal of hazardous drugs. There is no general agreement that all of the procedures recommended in the guidelines are necessary or appropriate.2,3,4,5

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration, once in the transfer syringe. Additionally, the diluted admixture solution should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is light sensitive and must be protected from direct and indirect sunlight and unshielded fluorescent light during the preparation and administration of the infusion (using an ultraviolet [UV] protective bag over the IV bag during infusion). All preparation should take place in a biologic safety hood with shielded fluorescent light. Vials are for single use. Aseptic technique must be strictly observed throughout the handling of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) since no bacteriostatic agent or preservative is present.

HOW SUPPLIED

Mylotarg® (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for Injection) is supplied as a single-vial package with an amber glass vial containing 5 mg of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) lyophilized powder. Single-unit 5 mg package: each vial contains 5 mg of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . NDC 0008-4510-01.

REFERENCES

1. OSHA. Controlling Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Drugs. OSHA Technical Manual; Section VI, Chapter 2, 1999.

2. NIH. Recommendations for the Safe Handling of Cytotoxic Drugs. NIH: Division of Safety, Clinical Center Pharmacy Department and Cancer Nursing Services, 1992. US Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service Publication NIH 92-2621.

3. American Society of Hospital Pharmacists. ASHP Technical Assistance Bulletin on Handling Cytotoxic and Hazardous Drugs. Am J Hosp Pharm. 1990;47:1033-1049.

4. Power LA, Anderson RW, Cortopassi R, Gera JR, Lewis RM. Update on Safe Handling of Hazardous Drugs: The Advice of Experts. Am J Hosp Pharm. 1990;47:1050-1060.

5. NIOSH. Preventing Occupational Exposure to Antineoplastic and Other Hazardous Drugs in Healthcare Settings. DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 2004-165, September 2004.

Wyeth Pharmaceuticals Inc. Philadelphia, PA 19101. Rev 01/07. FDA revision date: 1/23/2006

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

SIDE EFFECTS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) has been administered to 277 patients with relapsed AML at 9 mg/m² . Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) was generally given as two intravenous infusions separated by 14 days.

Acute Infusion-Related Events (Table 3)

TABLE 3: NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE OF PATIENTS REPORTED TO HAVE ACUTE INFUSION-RELATED ADVERSE EVENTS (N = 277)

Adverse Event Any Severity (%) Grade 3 or 4 (%)
Fever 227 (82) 17 (6)
Nausea 188 (68) 8 (3)
Chills 183 (66) 21 (8)
Vomiting 162 (58) 3 (1)
Headache 102 (37) 2 (< 1)
Dyspnea 73 (26) 4 (1)
Hypotension 55 (20) 12 (4)
Hypertension 43 (16) 5 (2)
Hyperglycemia 29 (10) 3 (1)
Hypoxia 15 (5) 4 (1)

Fever and chills were commonly reported despite prophylactic treatment with acetaminophen and antihistamines (see WARNINGS section). Generally, these symptoms occurred at the end of the 2 hour infusion and resolved after 2 to 4 hours with supportive therapy including acetaminophen, diphenhydramine, and intravenous fluids. These events all occurred on the same day as gemtuzumab ozogamicin infusion. Fewer infusion-related events were observed after the second dose. Methylprednisolone given prior to Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) infusion may ameliorate infusion-related symptoms.

Antibody Formation: Antibodies to gemtuzumab ozogamicin were not detected in any of the 277 patients, including the 20 patients who received more than 1 course of study drug, in the Phase 2 clinical studies. Two patients in a Phase 1 study developed antibody titers against the calicheamicin/calicheamicin-linker portion of gemtuzumab ozogamicin after three doses. One patient experienced transient fever, hypotension and dyspnea; the other patient had no clinical symptoms. No patient developed antibody responses to the hP67.6 antibody portion of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) .

Myelosuppression: Severe myelosuppression is the major toxicity associated with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) .

Neutropenia: During the treatment phase, 267/272 (98%) patients experienced Grade 3 or Grade 4 neutropenia. For all patients, the median times to ANC recovery at 500/μL for the CR and CRp patients were 40.0 and 43.0 days, respectively.

Anemia, Thrombocytopenia: During the treatment phase, 143/276 (52%) patients experienced Grade 3 or Grade 4 anemia and 272/276 (99%) patients experienced Grade 3 or Grade 4 thrombocytopenia. A summary of the platelet recovery for responding patients is provided in Table 4.

TABLE 4: MEDIAN TIME TO RECOVERY OF PLATELET COUNTS FOR ALL CR AND CRp PATIENTS (DAYS)

  CR CRp
Platelet levels < 60 years of age ≥ 60 years of age < 60 years of age ≥ 60 years of age
> 25,000/μL 35 38 39 75
50,000/μL 42 40 56 100
75,000/μL 48 42 122 NA
100,000/μL 56 50 NA NA
Abbreviation: NA = Not Available

Infection: During the treatment phase, 84/277 (30%) patients experienced Grade 3 or Grade 4 infections, including opportunistic infections. The most frequent Grade 3 or Grade 4 infection-related treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were sepsis (17%), pneumonia (8%), shock (4%), infection (3%), stomatitis (2%), and herpes simplex (2%).

Bleeding: During the treatment phase, 36/277 (13%) patients experienced Grade 3 or Grade 4 bleeding. The most common bleeding events for all patients were epistaxis (3%), cerebral hemorrhage (2%), intracranial hemorrhage (1%), melena (1%), petechiae (1%), hematuria (1%), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (1%).

A greater proportion of NR patients (15%) experienced NCI grade 3 or 4 bleeding events compared with OR patients (7%). Among CR patients, 1 grade 3 bleeding event, epistaxis, was experienced. Bleeding events occurred in 1/35 CR patients and 4/36 CRp patients.

Transfusions: During the treatment phase, more transfusions were required in the NR and CRp patients compared with the CRs (Table 5):

TABLE 5: NUMBER OF TRANSFUSIONS BY RESPONSE GROUP

Transfusions All Patients CR CRp NR
  N = 277 N = 35 N = 36 N = 206
Platelet transfusions
Mean (SD) NA 6.8 (7) 23.7 (67) 15.7 (20)
(95% CI)* NA (5.6, 8.0) (12.5, 34.9) (14.3, 17.1)
RBC transfusions
Mean (SD) NA 2.9 (3) 5.4 (4) 8.1 (22)
(95% CI) NA (2.4, 3.4) (4.7, 10.1) (8.0, 8.2)
* calculated - mean ± se where se = sd/sqr(n)

Mucositis: A total of 69/277 (25%) patients were reported to have a TEAE consistent with oral mucositis or stomatitis. During the treatment phase, 9/277 (3%) patients experienced Grade 3 or 4 stomatitis/mucositis after the first dose.

Hepatotoxicity: In clinical studies, 80/274 (29%) patients experienced Grade 3 or Grade 4 hyperbilirubinemia. 26/274 (9%) of patients experienced Grade 3 or Grade 4 abnormalities in levels of ALT, and 49/274 (18%) patients experienced Grade 3 or Grade 4 abnormalities in levels of AST. One patient died with liver failure in the setting of tumor lysis syndrome and multisystem organ failure 22 days after treatment. Another patient died after an episode of persistent jaundice and hepatosplenomegaly 156 days after treatment. Ascites, an event that can be associated with liver damage, was observed in 8 patients. Abnormalities of liver function were often transient and reversible.

VOD: A total of 299 courses of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) were administered in 277 relapsed patients and 16 episodes of VOD (in 15 patients) were identified (16/299, 5%). The incidence of VOD in patients treated with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) who had no prior or subsequent HSCT was 1.0%. The risk of developing VOD was 20% for patients with a history of HSCT prior to Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) administration. In patients who received HSCT after Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) administration, the risk of developing VOD was 15%. (See Table 6). In the 15 patients that developed VOD, 9 patients had fatal VOD or ongoing VOD at the time of death:

TABLE 6: INCIDENCE OF VOD REPORTED BY TREATMENT GROUPS

  Number
Courses of
Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection)
Number
Episodes
of VOD
Incidence
of VOD
(episodes per courses)
Number
Patients in
Classification
Number
Patients
with VOD
Incidence
of VOD
(in patients)
Mylotarg Total 299 16 5% 277 15 5%
Mylotarg Only 215 2 1% 200 2 1%
HSCT with Mylotarg (total)a 84 14 17% 77 13 17%
HSCT prior to Mylotargb,c 30 6 20% 27 6 22%
HSCT following Mylotargb,c 54 8 15% 52 8 15%
a: 3 patients are included in more than one HSCT category.
b: 2 patients with a pre-trial history of HSCT each received HSCT after Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) .
c: 1 patient received Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) followed by HSCT and then received a second course of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . This patient developed VOD after HSCT and again after the second course of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) .

Skin:Pruritus was reported in 18/277 (6%) patients, while rash occurred in 51/277 (18%) patients. Cutaneous herpes simplex was reported in 59/277 (21%) patients. No patient experienced alopecia.

Early Mortality in Clinical Studies

The overall mortality rate within 28 days of last dose was 16% (44/277). The mortality rate was 14% (17/120) for patients who were < 60 years old, and 17% (27/157) for patients who were ≥ 60 years old.

Retreatment Events: Twenty (20) patients received additional courses of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in the studies. One (1) patient received a total of 4 courses of treatment.

Dose Relationship for Adverse Events: Dose-relationship data were generated from a small dose-escalation study. The most common clinical adverse event observed in this study was an infusion-related symptom complex of fever and chills. In general, the severity of fever, but not chills, increased as the dose level increased. Only one dose level of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) was studied in the Phase 2 clinical trials in relapsed AML.

Treatment-Emergent Adverse Events (TEAE): TEAEs (Grades 1-4) that occurred in ≥ 10% of the patients regardless of causality are listed in Table 7.

TABLE 7: COMMONLY REPORTED ( ≥ 10%) TREATMENT-EMERGENT ADVERSE EVENTS BY AGE GROUP: NUMBER (%) OF PATIENTS

Body System
Adverse Event
Patient Age in Years
Age ≥ 60
(n = 157)
Age < 60
(n = 120)
Any Age
(n = 277)
Any adverse event 157 (100) 119 (99) 276 (100)
Body as a whole
Abdominal pain 41 (26) 47 (39) 88 (32)
Asthenia 56 (36) 44 (37) 100 (36)
Back pain 19 (12) 19 (16) 38 (14)
Chills 101 (64) 82 (68) 183 (66)
Fever 122 (78) 105 (88) 227 (82)
Headache 42 (27) 60 (50) 102 (37)
Infection 16 (10) 10 (8) 26 (9)
Neutropenic fever 30 (19) 18 (15) 48 (17)
Pain 28 (18) 21 (18) 49 (18)
Sepsis 40 (25) 33 (28) 73 (26)
Cardiovascular system
Hemorrhage 14 (9) 16 (13) 30 (11)
Hypertension 27 (17) 16 (13) 43 (16)
Hypotension 28 (18) 27 (23) 55 (20)
Tachycardia 17 (11) 11 (9) 28 (10)
Digestive system
Anorexia 43 (27) 26 (22) 69 (25)
Constipation 36 (23) 27 (23) 63 (23)
Diarrhea 47 (30) 43 (36) 90 (32)
Dyspepsia 13 (8) 15 (13) 28 (10)
Gum hemorrhage 8 (5) 17 (14) 25 (9)
Liver function tests abnormal 31 (20) 35 (29) 66 (24)
Nausea 99 (63) 89 (74) 188 (68)
Stomatitis 34 (22) 35 (29) 69 (25)
Vomiting 83 (53) 79 (66) 162 (58)
Hemic and lymphatic system
Anemia 34 (22) 26 (22) 60 (22)
Ecchymosis 17 (11) 11 (9) 28 (10)
Leukopenia 67 (43) 62 (52) 129 (47)
Petechiae 30 (19) 24 (20) 54 (19)
Thrombocytopenia 77 (49) 62 (52) 139 (50)
Metabolic and nutritional
Alkaline phosphatase increased 15 (10) 6 (5) 21 (8)
Bilirubinemia 18 (11) 15 (13) 33 (12)
Hyperglycemia 17 (11) 12 (10) 29 (10)
Hypocalcemia 15 (10) 14 (12) 29 (10)
Hypokalemia 38 (24) 35 (29) 73 (26)
Hypomagnesemia 4 (3) 12 (10) 16 (6)
Hypophosphatemia 9 (6) 12 (10) 21 (8)
Lactic dehydrogenase increased 28 (18) 17 (14) 45 (16)
Peripheral edema 30 (19) 10 (8) 40 (14)
Musculoskeletal system      
Myalgia 5 (3) 13 (11) 18 (6)
Nervous system      
Anxiety 15 (10) 8 (7) 23 (8)
Depression 15 (10) 9 (8) 24 (9)
Dizziness 15 (10) 18 (15) 33 (12)
Insomnia 17 (11) 16 (13) 33 (12)
Respiratory system
Cough increased 28 (18) 19 (16) 47 (17)
Dyspnea 41 (26) 32 (27) 73 (26)
Epistaxis 37 (24) 41 (34) 78 (28)
Pharyngitis 16 (10) 17 (14) 33 (12)
Pneumonia 20 (13) 15 (13) 35 (13)
Pulmonary physical finding 13 (8) 12 (10) 25 (9)
Rhinitis 11 (7) 12 (10) 23 (8)
Skin and appendages
Herpes simplex 29 (18) 30 (25) 59 (21)
Pruritus 6 (4) 12 (10) 18 (6)
Rash 29 (18) 22 (18) 51 (18)
Urogenital system
Metrorrhagia 1 (2) 6 (10) 7 (3)
Vaginal hemorrhage 3 (5) 9 (15) 12 (4)
Adverse event associated with miscellaneous factors
Local reaction to procedure 27 (17) 33 (28) 60 (22)

TEAEs of NCI grade 3 or 4 severity that occurred in part I of studies with an incidence of ≥ 10% in at least 1 age subgroup, are presented in Table 8.

TABLE 8: NUMBER (%) OF PATIENTS REPORTING NCI GRADE 3 OR 4 TREATMENT-EMERGENT ADVERSE EVENTS DURING PART I BY AGE GROUP: EVENTS WITH INCIDENCE ≥ 10%

Body System
Adverse Event
Patient Age in Years
Age ≥ 60
(n = 157)
Age < 60
(n = 120)
Any Age
(n = 277)
Any adverse event 138 (88) 112 (93) 250 (90)
Body as a whole
Chills 17 (11) 9 (8) 26 (9)
Fever 20 (13) 16 (13) 36 (13)
Sepsis 23 (15) 24 (20) 47 (17)
Digestive system
Liver function tests abnormal 11 (7) 12 (10) 23 (8)
Hemic and lymphatic system
Anemia 19 (12) 19 (16) 38 (14)
Leukopenia 67 (43) 60 (50) 127 (46)
Thrombocytopenia 75 (48) 61 (51) 136 (49)
Respiratory system
Dyspnea 15 (10) 8 (7) 23 (8)
Abbreviation: NCI = National Cancer Institute.

Clinically important laboratory abnormalities with a Grade 3 or 4 severity are listed in Table 9

TABLE 9: NUMBER (%a) OF PATIENTS WITH LABORATORY TEST RESULTS OF GRADE 3 OR 4 SEVERITYb

Efficacy and Safety Studies Grades 3 - 4
Test Age ≥ 60
(n = 157)
Age < 60
(n = 120)
All Patients
(n = 277)
Hematologic
  Hemoglobin 79/157 (50) 64/119 (54) 143/276 (52)
  WBC 149/157 (95) 117/119 (98) 266/276 (96)
  Total neutrophils,absolute 152/155 (98) 115/117 (98) 267/272 (98)
  Lymphocytes 144/155 (93) 111/117 (95) 255/272 (94)
  Platelet count 155/157 (99) 117/119 (98) 272/276 (99)
  Prothrombin time 2/35 (6) 4/34 (12) 6/69 (9)
  Partial thromboplastin time 1/66 (2) 1/61 (2) 2/127 (2)
Non-hematologic
  Glucose (hypo/hyper)  19/155 (12) 13/119 (11) 32/274 (12)
  Creatinine 1/157 ( < 1) 4/119 (3) 5/276 (2)
  Total bilirubin 45/156 (29) 35/118 (30) 80/274 (29)
  AST 25/156 (16) 24/118 (20) 49/274 (18)
  ALT 12/156 (8) 14/118 (12) 26/274 (9)
  Alkaline phosphatase 4/156 (3) 7/118 (6) 11/274 (4)
  Calcium (hypo/hyper) 14/157 (9) 21/119 (18) 35/276 (13)
a: Percentage is based on the number of patients receiving a particular laboratory test during the study as is indicated for each test.
b: Severity as defined by NCI common toxicity scale version 1.

There were considered to be no clinically important differences in TEAEs between patients < 60 years of age and those patients ≥ 60.

There were considered to be no clinically important differences in TEAEs between female and male patients.

Other Clinical Experience

In postmarketing experience and other clinical trials, additional cases of VOD have been reported, some in association with the use of other chemotherapeutic agents, underlying hepatic disease/abnormal liver function, or a history of prior or subsequent HSCT. Renal failure, renal failure secondary to TLS, renal impairment, hypersensitivity reactions (including bradycardia), anaphylaxis, pulmonary events, pulmonary hemorrhage, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, Budd Chiari Syndrome, portal vein thrombosis, and neutropenic sepsis have also been reported in association with the use of Mylotarg. (See WARNINGS section).

Observational Study: A prospective postmarketing registry study is being conducted to assess the safety of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) under conditions of routine clinical practice. The primary objectives is to estimate the incidence of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) among patients treated with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . In an interim analysis of 225 patients, SAEs are presented according to an “events of special interest” (ESI) classification comprised of hepatic (including VOD), renal, infusion-related, pulmonary, and hypersensitivity events (Table 10).

There were 816 SAEs reported in 197/225 patients (87.6% of all patients). Of the SAEs, 159 were also ESIs reported in 64 (28.4%) patients. The percentage of patients experiencing a serious ESI was 9.8% (hepatic), 6.7% (renal), 8.0% (infusion-related), and 12.9% (pulmonary). Among the 816 SAEs, 225 (27.6%) were fatal events (multiple concurrent fatal events could be reported for a patient) reported in 134 (59.6%) patients. Using the ESI classification, there were 30 fatal ESIs reported in 19 (8.4%) patients.

In this registry, the incidence of VOD based on an independent review is 10.2% (23/225). Among patients with HSCT before or after Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) infusion the incidence of VOD was 14.9% (10/67 patients). For patients without HSCT the VOD incidence was 8.2% (12/146 patients). HSCT status was not reported in 8.3% (19/225) of patients.

TABLE 10: SERIOUS ADVERSE EVENTS REPORTED IN THE MYLOTARG (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY (N=225)a

Reported events All events Fatal events
Number events Number patients Percent patients (n=225) Number events Number patients Percent patients (n=225)
TOTAL 816 197 87.6 225 134 59.6
Hepatic 51 22 9.8 6 4 1.8
Renal 21 15 6.7 5 5 2.2
Infusion-related 35 18 8.0 4 1 0.4
Pulmonary 52 29 12.9 15 13 5.8
Hypersensitivity 0 0 - 0 0 -
Other 657 188 83.6 195 130 57.8
aBased on interim data, the denominator represents all patients in the registry, including 11 patients for whom no adverse events were reported at the time of database lock for the interim analysis.

Read the Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects »

DRUG INTERACTIONS

There have been no formal drug-interaction studies performed with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . The potential for drug-drug interaction with drugs affected by cytochrome P450 enzymes may not be ruled out.

Laboratory Test Interactions: Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is not known to interfere with any routine diagnostic tests.

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

WARNINGS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should be administered under the supervision of physicians experienced in the treatment of acute leukemia and in facilities equipped to monitor and treat leukemia patients.

There are no controlled trials demonstrating efficacy and safety using Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should only be used as single agent chemotherapy and not in combination chemotherapy regimens outside clinical trials.

Myelosuppression: Severe myelosuppression will occur in all patients given the recommended dose of this agent. Careful hematologic monitoring is required. Systemic infections should be treated.

Hypersensitivity Reactions Including Anaphylaxis, Infusion Reactions, Pulmonary Events: Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) administration can result in severe hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis), and other infusion-related reactions which may include severe pulmonary events. Infrequently, hypersensitivity reactions and pulmonary events have been fatal. In most cases, infusion-related symptoms occurred during the infusion or within 24 hours of administration of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) and resolved.

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) infusion should be interrupted for patients experiencing dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension. Patients should be monitored until signs and symptoms completely resolve. Discontinuation of further Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) treatment should be strongly considered for patients who develop anaphylaxis, pulmonary edema, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Since patients with high peripheral blast counts may be at greater risk for such reactions, physicians should consider leukoreduction with hydroxyurea or leukapheresis to reduce the peripheral white count to below 30,000/μL prior to administration of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) .

Infusion Reactions: Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) can produce a post-infusion symptom complex of fever and chills, and less commonly hypotension and dyspnea that may occur during the first 24 hours after administration. Grade 3 or 4 non-hematologic infusion-related adverse events included chills, fever, hypotension, hypertension, hyperglycemia, hypoxia, and dyspnea. Most patients received the following prophylactic medications before administration: diphenhydramine 50 mg po and acetaminophen 650-1000 mg po; thereafter, two additional doses of acetaminophen 650-1000 mg po, one every 4 hours as needed. Vital signs should be monitored during infusion and for the four hours following infusion.

In clinical studies, these symptoms generally occurred after the end of the 2-hour intravenous infusion and resolved after 2 to 4 hours with a supportive therapy of acetaminophen, diphenhydramine, and IV fluids. Fewer infusion-related events were observed after the second dose.

Pulmonary Events: Severe pulmonary events leading to death have been reported infrequently with the use of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in the postmarketing setting. Signs, symptoms and clinical findings include dyspnea, pulmonary infiltrates, pleural effusions, non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, pulmonary insufficiency and hypoxia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. These events occur as sequelae of infusion reactions; patients with WBC counts ≥ 30,000/μL may be at increased risk. (See Infusion Reactions section of WARNINGS.) Physicians should consider leukoreduction with hydroxyurea or leukapheresis to reduce the peripheral white count to below 30,000/μL prior to administration of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Patients with symptomatic intrinsic lung disease may also be at greater risk of severe pulmonary reactions.

Hepatotoxicity: Hepatotoxicity, including severe VOD, has been reported in association with the use of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) as a single agent, as part of a combination chemotherapy regimen, and in patients without a history of liver disease or HSCT. Patients who receive Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) either before or after HSCT, patients with underlying hepatic disease or abnormal liver function, and patients receiving Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combinations with other chemotherapy may be at increased risk for developing VOD, including severe VOD. Patients who had received HSCT before Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) were at a higher risk of VOD (22%) than patients who had not been transplanted (1%). Patients who had received HSCT following Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) were at a higher risk of VOD (15%) than patients who had not been transplanted (1%). Death from liver failure and from VOD has been reported in patients who received Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Physicians should monitor their patients carefully for symptoms of hepatotoxicity, particularly VOD. These symptoms can include: rapid weight gain, right upper quadrant pain, hepatomegaly, ascites, elevations in bilirubin and/or liver enzymes. However, careful monitoring may not identify all patients at risk or prevent the complications of hepatotoxicity. (See ADVERSE REACTIONS section.)

Use in Patients with Hepatic Impairment: Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) has not been studied in patients with bilirubin > 2 mg/dL. Extra caution should be exercised when administering Mylotarg in patients with hepatic impairment (see ADVERSE REACTIONS section).

Tumor Lysis Syndrome (TLS): TLS may be a consequence of leukemia treatment with any chemotherapeutic agent including Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Renal failure secondary to TLS has been reported in association with the use of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Appropriate measures, (e.g. hydration and allopurinol), must be taken to prevent hyperuricemia. Physicians should consider leukoreduction with hydroxyurea or leukapheresis to reduce the peripheral white blood count to < 30,000/μL prior to administration of Mylotarg (see Clinical Studies section).

Pregnancy: Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) may cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. Daily treatment of pregnant rats with gemtuzumab ozogamicin during organogenesis caused dose-related decreases in fetal weight in association with dose-related decreases in fetal skeletal ossification beginning at 0.025 mg/kg/day. Doses of 0.060 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.04 times the recommended human single dose on a mg/m² basis) produced increased embryo-fetal mortality (increased numbers of resorptions and decreased numbers of live fetuses per litter). Gross external, visceral, and skeletal alterations at the 0.060 mg/kg/day dose level included digital malformations (ectrodactyly, brachydactyly) in one or both hind feet, absence of the aortic arch, wavy ribs, anomalies of the long bones in the forelimb(s) (short/thick humerus, misshapen radius and ulna, and short/thick ulna), misshapen scapula, absence of vertebral centrum, and fused sternebrae. This dose was also associated with maternal toxicity (decreased weight gain, decreased food consumption). There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. If Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is used in pregnancy, or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking it, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus. Women of childbearing potential should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while receiving treatment with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) .

PRECAUTIONS

DO NOT ADMINISTER AS AN INTRAVENOUS PUSH OR BOLUS

General

Treatment by Experienced Physicians: Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should be administered under the supervision of physicians experienced in the treatment of acute leukemia and in facilities equipped to monitor and treat leukemia patients.

Laboratory Monitoring: Electrolytes, tests of hepatic function, complete blood counts (CBCs) and platelet counts should be monitored during Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) therapy.

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility: No long-term studies in animals have been performed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Gemtuzumab ozogamicin was clastogenic in the mouse in vivo micronucleus test. This positive result is consistent with the known ability of calicheamicin to cause double-stranded breaks in DNA. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin adversely affected male, but not female, fertility in rats. Following daily administration of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to male rats for 28 days at doses of 0.02 to 0.16 mg/kg/day (approximately 0.01 to 0.11 times the human dose on a mg/m² basis) gemtuzumab ozogamicin caused: decreased fertility rates, epididymal sperm counts, and sperm motility; increased incidence of sperm abnormalities; and microscopic evidence of decreased spermatogonia and spermatocyte count. These findings did not resolve following a 9-week recovery period.

Pregnancy Category D: See WARNINGS section.

Nursing Mothers: It is not known if Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs, including immunoglobulins, are excreted in human milk, and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) , a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Pediatric Use: The safety and effectiveness of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in pediatric patients have not been established.

Use in Patients with Renal Impairment: Patients with renal impairment were not studied.

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

OVERDOSE

No cases of overdose with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) were reported in clinical experience. Single doses higher than 9 mg/m² in adults were not tested. When a single dose of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) was administered to animals, mortality was observed in rats at the dose of 2 mg/kg (approximately 1.3-times the recommended human dose on a mg/m² basis), and in male monkeys at the dose of 4.5 mg/kg (approximately 6-times the recommended human dose on a mg/m² basis).

Signs and Symptoms: Signs of overdose with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) are unknown.

Recommended Treatment: General supportive measures should be followed in case of overdose. Blood pressure and blood counts should be carefully monitored. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is not dialyzable.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is contraindicated in patients with a known hypersensitivity to gemtuzumab ozogamicin or any of its components: anti-CD33 antibody (hP67.6), calicheamicin derivatives, or inactive ingredients.

Mylotarg is contraindicated in lactating mothers (see PRECAUTIONS, Nursing Mothers).

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

General

Gemtuzumab ozogamicin binds to the CD33 antigen. This antigen is expressed on the surface of leukemic blasts in more than 80% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). CD33 is also expressed on normal and leukemic myeloid colony-forming cells, including leukemic clonogenic precursors, but it is not expressed on pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells or on nonhematopoietic cells.

Mechanism of Action: Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is directed against the CD33 antigen expressed by hematopoietic cells. Binding of the anti-CD33 antibody portion of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) with the CD33 antigen results in the formation of a complex that is internalized. Upon internalization, the calicheamicin derivative is released inside the lysosomes of the myeloid cell. The released calicheamicin derivative binds to DNA in the minor groove resulting in DNA double strand breaks and cell death.

Gemtuzumab ozogamicin is cytotoxic to the CD33 positive HL-60 human leukemia cell line. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin produces significant inhibition of colony formation in cultures of adult leukemic bone marrow cells. The cytotoxic effect on normal myeloid precursors leads to substantial myelosuppression, but this is reversible because pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells are spared. In preclinical animal studies, gemtuzumab ozogamicin demonstrates antitumor effects in the HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia xenograft tumor in athymic mice.

Human Pharmacokinetics

After administration of the first recommended 9 mg/m² dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin, given as a 2 hour infusion, the elimination half lives of total and unconjugated calicheamicin were about 41 and 143 hours, respectively. After the second 9 mg/m² dose, the half life of total calicheamicin was increased to about 64 hours and the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) was about twice that in the first dose period. The AUC for the unconjugated calicheamicin increased 30% after the second dose. Age, gender, body surface area (BSA), and weight did not affect the pharmacokinetics of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) .

Patients, especially patients previously treated with HSCT, have an underlying risk of VOD. The AUC of total calicheamicin was correlated with additional risk of hepatomegaly and the risk of veno-occlusive disease (VOD). There is no evidence that reducing Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) dose will reduce the underlying risk of VOD. Metabolic studies indicate hydrolytic release of the calicheamicin derivative from gemtuzumab ozogamicin. Many metabolites of this derivative were found after in vitro incubation of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in human liver microsomes and cytosol, and in HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells. Metabolic studies characterizing the possible isozymes involved in the metabolic pathway of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) have not been performed.

Clinical Studies

The efficacy and safety of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) as a single agent have been evaluated in 277 patients in three single arm open-label studies in patients with CD33 positive AML in first relapse. The studies included 84, 95, and 98 patients. In studies 1 and 2 patients were ≥ 18 years of age with a first remission duration of at least 6 months. In study 3, only patients ≥ 60 were enrolled and their first remission had to have lasted for at least 3 months. Patients with secondary leukemia or white blood cell (WBC) counts ≥ 30,000/μL were excluded. Some patients were leukoreduced with hydroxyurea or leukapheresis to lower WBC counts below 30,000/μL in order to minimize the risk of tumor lysis syndrome. The treatment course included two 9 mg/m² doses separated by 14 days and a 28-day follow-up after the last dose. Although smaller doses had elicited responses in earlier studies, the 9 mg/m² was chosen because it would be expected to saturate all CD33 sites regardless of leukemic burden. A total of 157 patients were ≥ 60 years of age and older. The primary endpoint of the three clinical studies was the rate of complete remission (CR), which was defined as

  1. leukemic blasts absent from the peripheral blood;
  2. ≤ 5% blasts in the bone marrow, as measured by morphology studies;
  3. hemoglobin (Hgb) ≥ 9 g/dL, platelets ≥ 100,000/μL, absolute neutrophil count (ANC) ≥ 1500/μL; and
  4. red cell and platelet-transfusion independence (no red cell transfusions for 2 weeks; no platelet transfusions for 1 week).

In addition to CR, a second response category, CRp, was defined as patients satisfying the definition of CR, including platelet transfusion independence, with the exception of platelet recovery ≥ 100,000/μL. Remission status was determined at approximately 28 days after the last dose of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . This category was added because Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) appears to delay platelet recovery in some patients. Clinical equivalence between CR and CRp responses has not been established. Median time to recovery of platelet counts in patients who achieved a CR or a CRp is summarized in TABLE 4 (see ADVERSE REACTIONS section).

All patients were pre-medicated with acetaminophen 650-1000 mg and diphenhydramine 50 mg to decrease acute infusion-related symptoms. Growth factors and cytokines were not permitted. Use of prophylactic antibiotics was not specified.

Response Rate

The overall response (OR) rate for the three pooled monotherapy studies was 26% (71/277) consisting of 13% (35/277) of patients with CR and 13% (36/277) of patients with CRp. The median time to blast clearance in both CR and CRp patients was 28 days from the first dose of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . The median time to remission was 60 days for both CR and CRp. Remission rates are shown in Table 1. Of the 157 patients who were ≥ 60 years old, the overall remission rate (OR = CR + CRp) was 24%. For the patients < 60 years old and all 277 patients the OR rates were 28% and 26%, respectively. Two of the most important determinants of response following relapse are age and duration of first remission. Remission rates by prognostic category are outlined in Table 1.

TABLE 1: PERCENTAGE OF PATIENTS BY REMISSION CATEGORY AND PROGNOSTIC GROUP

  Age < 60 years Age ≥ 60 years First Remission < 6 months First Remission 6 - 12 months First Remission ≥ 12 months
Type of Remission n = 120 n = 157 n = 37 n = 124 n = 116
CR (95% CI) 13 12 5 10 18
8, 21 7, 18 1, 18 5, 16 12, 26
CRp (95% CI) 14 12 5 12 16
8, 22 7, 18 1, 18 7, 19 10, 24
OR (CR + CRp) (95% CI) 28 24 11 22 35
20, 36 18, 32 3, 25 15, 30 26, 44

The overall response rates were similar for females and males: 27% of females and 25% of males achieved remission.

In the studies, 95% of the patients were white and 5% of the patients were non-white.

Survival

Overall survival was measured from date of first dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin to date of death or data cut-off date (Table 2). Relapse-free survival (duration of remission) for patients in remission was defined as the time period from date of first documentation of maximum response (CR or CRp) to the first date of documentation of relapse (pathology report or complete blood count showing leukemic blast recurrence in peripheral blood or bone marrow), or death, or data cut-off date.

TABLE 2: SUMMARY OF RELAPSE FREEa and OVERALL SURVIVAL FOR PATIENTS WITH CR AND CRp

Remission Group N Relapse-Free
Median months
Overall Survival
Median monthsc
CR 35 6.4 12.0
CRp 36 4.5 12.7
ORb 71 5.2 12.4
Patients who responded to Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) and received no further therapy
CR 17 3.7 11.5
CRp 18 2.4 10.7
OR 35 2.4 11.1
a: Number of months after achieving CR or CRp.
b: Sixteen OR patients (6 CR and 10 CRp; 16/277; 5.7%) had a relapse-free survival at 12 months. 14/16 had stem cell transplants. 1/14 had a stem cell transplant prior to Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . The remaining 13 patients had stem cell transplants after Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Six OR patients (3 CR and 3 CRp) had a relapse-free survival > 36 months. All 6 of these patients had subsequent stem cell transplants, representing 2.2% (6/277) of all patients.
c: The median overall survival was 3.3 months for NR patients; in all 277 patients it was 4.9 months.

Rates of Remission by Cytogenetic Risk

Patients in all three cytogenetic risk classification groups (poor, intermediate, favorable) responded to gemtuzumab ozogamicin.

Post-Remission Therapy

Twenty-five (25/71, 35%) OR patients (11 CR and 14 CRp patients) went on to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Fourteen (14) received allogeneic HSCT and 11 received autologous HSCT.

Thirty-five (35/71, 49%) OR patients (17 CR and 18 CRp patients) who responded to treatment with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) received no additional therapy.

Repeat Courses

Twenty (20) patients have received more than 1 course of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in clinical trials. These patients were initially treated with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) , achieved remission, then subsequently relapsed and then received additional doses of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) .

Overview of Clinical Data

Available single arm trial data do not provide valid comparisons with various cytotoxic regimens that have been used in relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. Response rates are in the range of rates reported with such regimens only if the CRp responses are included. Nevertheless, treatment with Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) can provide responses, including some of reasonable duration. The data support its use in patients for whom aggressive cytotoxic regimens would be considered unsuitable, such as many patients 60 years of age or older.

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

PATIENT INFORMATION

No information provided. Please refer to the WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS sections.

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

>

PATIENT INFORMATION

No information provided. Please refer to the WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS sections.

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Mylotarg®
(gemtuzumab ozogamicin for) Injection

for intravenous use only

This product's label may have been revised after this insert was used in production. For further product information and current package insert, please visit www.wyeth.com or call our medical communications department toll-free at 1-800-934-5556.

WARNINGS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should be administered under the supervision of physicians experienced in the treatment of acute leukemia and in facilities equipped to monitor and treat leukemia patients.

There are no controlled trials demonstrating efficacy and safety using Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should only be used as single agent chemotherapy and not in combination chemotherapy regimens outside clinical trials.

Severe myelosuppression occurs when Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is used at recommended doses.

HYPERSENSITIVITY REACTIONS INCLUDING ANAPHYLAXIS, INFUSION REACTIONS, PULMONARY EVENTS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) administration can result in severe hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis), and other infusion-related reactions which may include severe pulmonary events. Infrequently, hypersensitivity reactions and pulmonary events have been fatal. In most cases, infusion-related symptoms occurred during the infusion or within 24 hours of administration of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) and resolved. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) infusion should be interrupted for patients experiencing dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension. Patients should be monitored until signs and symptoms completely resolve. Discontinuation of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) treatment should be strongly considered for patients who develop anaphylaxis, pulmonary edema, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Since patients with high peripheral blast counts may be at greater risk for pulmonary events and tumor lysis syndrome, physicians should consider leukoreduction with hydroxyurea or leukapheresis to reduce the peripheral white count to below 30,000/µL prior to administration of Mylotarg. (See WARNINGS.)

HEPATOTOXICITY

Hepatotoxicity, including severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), has been reported in association with the use of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) as a single agent, as part of a combination chemotherapy regimen, and in patients without a history of liver disease or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Patients who receive Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) either before or after HSCT, patients with underlying hepatic disease or abnormal liver function, and patients receiving Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combinations with other chemotherapy are at increased risk for developing VOD, including severe VOD. Death from liver failure and from VOD has been reported in patients who received Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Physicians should monitor their patients carefully for symptoms of hepatotoxicity, particularly VOD. These symptoms can include: rapid weight gain, right upper quadrant pain, hepatomegaly, ascites, elevations in bilirubin and/or liver enzymes. However, careful monitoring may not identify all patients at risk or prevent the complications of hepatotoxicity. (See WARNINGS and ADVERSE REACTIONS sections.)

DRUG DESCRIPTION

Mylotarg® (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for Injection) is a chemotherapy agent composed of a recombinant humanized IgG4, kappa antibody conjugated with a cytotoxic antitumor antibiotic, calicheamicin, isolated from fermentation of a bacterium, Micromonospora echinospora subsp. calichensis. The antibody portion of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) binds specifically to the CD33 antigen, a sialic acid-dependent adhesion protein found on the surface of leukemic blasts and immature normal cells of myelomonocytic lineage, but not on normal hematopoietic stem cells.

Mylotarg® (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) Structural Formula Illustration

The anti-CD33 hP67.6 antibody is produced by mammalian cell suspension culture using a myeloma NS0 cell line and is purified under conditions which remove or inactivate viruses. Three separate and independent steps in the hP67.6 antibody purification process achieves retrovirus inactivation and removal. These include low pH treatment, DEAE-Sepharose chromatography, and viral filtration. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) contains amino acid sequences of which approximately 98.3% are of human origin. The constant region and framework regions contain human sequences while the complementarity-determining regions are derived from a murine antibody (p67.6) that binds CD33. This antibody is linked to N-acetyl-gamma calicheamicin via a bifunctional linker. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has approximately 50% of the antibody loaded with 4-6 moles calicheamicin per mole of antibody. The remaining 50% of the antibody is not linked to the calicheamicin derivative. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has a molecular weight of 151 to 153 kDa.

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is a sterile, white, preservative-free lyophilized powder containing 5 mg of drug conjugate (protein equivalent) in an amber vial. The drug product is light sensitive and must be protected from direct and indirect sunlight and unshielded fluorescent light during the preparation and administration of the infusion. The inactive ingredients are: dextran 40; sucrose; sodium chloride; monobasic and dibasic sodium phosphate.

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Mylotarg®
(gemtuzumab ozogamicin for) Injection

for intravenous use only

This product's label may have been revised after this insert was used in production. For further product information and current package insert, please visit www.wyeth.com or call our medical communications department toll-free at 1-800-934-5556.

WARNINGS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should be administered under the supervision of physicians experienced in the treatment of acute leukemia and in facilities equipped to monitor and treat leukemia patients.

There are no controlled trials demonstrating efficacy and safety using Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should only be used as single agent chemotherapy and not in combination chemotherapy regimens outside clinical trials.

Severe myelosuppression occurs when Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is used at recommended doses.

HYPERSENSITIVITY REACTIONS INCLUDING ANAPHYLAXIS, INFUSION REACTIONS, PULMONARY EVENTS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) administration can result in severe hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis), and other infusion-related reactions which may include severe pulmonary events. Infrequently, hypersensitivity reactions and pulmonary events have been fatal. In most cases, infusion-related symptoms occurred during the infusion or within 24 hours of administration of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) and resolved. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) infusion should be interrupted for patients experiencing dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension. Patients should be monitored until signs and symptoms completely resolve. Discontinuation of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) treatment should be strongly considered for patients who develop anaphylaxis, pulmonary edema, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Since patients with high peripheral blast counts may be at greater risk for pulmonary events and tumor lysis syndrome, physicians should consider leukoreduction with hydroxyurea or leukapheresis to reduce the peripheral white count to below 30,000/µL prior to administration of Mylotarg. (See WARNINGS.)

HEPATOTOXICITY

Hepatotoxicity, including severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), has been reported in association with the use of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) as a single agent, as part of a combination chemotherapy regimen, and in patients without a history of liver disease or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Patients who receive Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) either before or after HSCT, patients with underlying hepatic disease or abnormal liver function, and patients receiving Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combinations with other chemotherapy are at increased risk for developing VOD, including severe VOD. Death from liver failure and from VOD has been reported in patients who received Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Physicians should monitor their patients carefully for symptoms of hepatotoxicity, particularly VOD. These symptoms can include: rapid weight gain, right upper quadrant pain, hepatomegaly, ascites, elevations in bilirubin and/or liver enzymes. However, careful monitoring may not identify all patients at risk or prevent the complications of hepatotoxicity. (See WARNINGS and ADVERSE REACTIONS sections.)

DRUG DESCRIPTION

Mylotarg® (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for Injection) is a chemotherapy agent composed of a recombinant humanized IgG4, kappa antibody conjugated with a cytotoxic antitumor antibiotic, calicheamicin, isolated from fermentation of a bacterium, Micromonospora echinospora subsp. calichensis. The antibody portion of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) binds specifically to the CD33 antigen, a sialic acid-dependent adhesion protein found on the surface of leukemic blasts and immature normal cells of myelomonocytic lineage, but not on normal hematopoietic stem cells.

Mylotarg® (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) Structural Formula Illustration

The anti-CD33 hP67.6 antibody is produced by mammalian cell suspension culture using a myeloma NS0 cell line and is purified under conditions which remove or inactivate viruses. Three separate and independent steps in the hP67.6 antibody purification process achieves retrovirus inactivation and removal. These include low pH treatment, DEAE-Sepharose chromatography, and viral filtration. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) contains amino acid sequences of which approximately 98.3% are of human origin. The constant region and framework regions contain human sequences while the complementarity-determining regions are derived from a murine antibody (p67.6) that binds CD33. This antibody is linked to N-acetyl-gamma calicheamicin via a bifunctional linker. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has approximately 50% of the antibody loaded with 4-6 moles calicheamicin per mole of antibody. The remaining 50% of the antibody is not linked to the calicheamicin derivative. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has a molecular weight of 151 to 153 kDa.

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is a sterile, white, preservative-free lyophilized powder containing 5 mg of drug conjugate (protein equivalent) in an amber vial. The drug product is light sensitive and must be protected from direct and indirect sunlight and unshielded fluorescent light during the preparation and administration of the infusion. The inactive ingredients are: dextran 40; sucrose; sodium chloride; monobasic and dibasic sodium phosphate.

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Mylotarg®
(gemtuzumab ozogamicin for) Injection

for intravenous use only

This product's label may have been revised after this insert was used in production. For further product information and current package insert, please visit www.wyeth.com or call our medical communications department toll-free at 1-800-934-5556.

WARNINGS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should be administered under the supervision of physicians experienced in the treatment of acute leukemia and in facilities equipped to monitor and treat leukemia patients.

There are no controlled trials demonstrating efficacy and safety using Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. Therefore, Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) should only be used as single agent chemotherapy and not in combination chemotherapy regimens outside clinical trials.

Severe myelosuppression occurs when Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is used at recommended doses.

HYPERSENSITIVITY REACTIONS INCLUDING ANAPHYLAXIS, INFUSION REACTIONS, PULMONARY EVENTS

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) administration can result in severe hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis), and other infusion-related reactions which may include severe pulmonary events. Infrequently, hypersensitivity reactions and pulmonary events have been fatal. In most cases, infusion-related symptoms occurred during the infusion or within 24 hours of administration of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) and resolved. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) infusion should be interrupted for patients experiencing dyspnea or clinically significant hypotension. Patients should be monitored until signs and symptoms completely resolve. Discontinuation of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) treatment should be strongly considered for patients who develop anaphylaxis, pulmonary edema, or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Since patients with high peripheral blast counts may be at greater risk for pulmonary events and tumor lysis syndrome, physicians should consider leukoreduction with hydroxyurea or leukapheresis to reduce the peripheral white count to below 30,000/µL prior to administration of Mylotarg. (See WARNINGS.)

HEPATOTOXICITY

Hepatotoxicity, including severe hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), has been reported in association with the use of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) as a single agent, as part of a combination chemotherapy regimen, and in patients without a history of liver disease or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Patients who receive Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) either before or after HSCT, patients with underlying hepatic disease or abnormal liver function, and patients receiving Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) in combinations with other chemotherapy are at increased risk for developing VOD, including severe VOD. Death from liver failure and from VOD has been reported in patients who received Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) . Physicians should monitor their patients carefully for symptoms of hepatotoxicity, particularly VOD. These symptoms can include: rapid weight gain, right upper quadrant pain, hepatomegaly, ascites, elevations in bilirubin and/or liver enzymes. However, careful monitoring may not identify all patients at risk or prevent the complications of hepatotoxicity. (See WARNINGS and ADVERSE REACTIONS sections.)

DRUG DESCRIPTION

Mylotarg® (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for Injection) is a chemotherapy agent composed of a recombinant humanized IgG4, kappa antibody conjugated with a cytotoxic antitumor antibiotic, calicheamicin, isolated from fermentation of a bacterium, Micromonospora echinospora subsp. calichensis. The antibody portion of Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) binds specifically to the CD33 antigen, a sialic acid-dependent adhesion protein found on the surface of leukemic blasts and immature normal cells of myelomonocytic lineage, but not on normal hematopoietic stem cells.

Mylotarg® (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) Structural Formula Illustration

The anti-CD33 hP67.6 antibody is produced by mammalian cell suspension culture using a myeloma NS0 cell line and is purified under conditions which remove or inactivate viruses. Three separate and independent steps in the hP67.6 antibody purification process achieves retrovirus inactivation and removal. These include low pH treatment, DEAE-Sepharose chromatography, and viral filtration. Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) contains amino acid sequences of which approximately 98.3% are of human origin. The constant region and framework regions contain human sequences while the complementarity-determining regions are derived from a murine antibody (p67.6) that binds CD33. This antibody is linked to N-acetyl-gamma calicheamicin via a bifunctional linker. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has approximately 50% of the antibody loaded with 4-6 moles calicheamicin per mole of antibody. The remaining 50% of the antibody is not linked to the calicheamicin derivative. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin has a molecular weight of 151 to 153 kDa.

Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) is a sterile, white, preservative-free lyophilized powder containing 5 mg of drug conjugate (protein equivalent) in an amber vial. The drug product is light sensitive and must be protected from direct and indirect sunlight and unshielded fluorescent light during the preparation and administration of the infusion. The inactive ingredients are: dextran 40; sucrose; sodium chloride; monobasic and dibasic sodium phosphate.

Last reviewed on RxList: 6/24/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Mylotarg Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Mylotarg

Generic Name: gemtuzumab (Pronunciation: jem TOOZ oo mab)

What is gemtuzumab (Mylotarg)?

Gemtuzumab is a cancer medication. Gemtuzumab interferes with the growth of cancer cells and slows their growth and spread in the body.

Gemtuzumab is used to treat acute myeloid leukemia, a type of blood cancer. Gemtuzumab is usually given to people who are at least 60 years old and have a relapse of their disease and who cannot receive other cancer medications.

Gemtuzumab may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of gemtuzumab (Mylotarg)?

Some people receiving a gemtuzumab injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you feel dizzy, nauseated, light-headed, sweaty, or have fever, chills, or trouble breathing within 24 hours after receiving the injection.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • pain in your upper right stomach, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • swelling, rapid weight gain;
  • feeling like you might pass out;
  • pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding (such as nosebleeds), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;
  • fever, chills, body aches, unusual weakness, flu symptoms;
  • white patches or sores inside your mouth or on your lips;
  • chest pain or tightness, feeling short of breath;
  • lower back pain, blood in your urine;
  • increased thirst, fruity breath odor, increased urination;
  • urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • numbness or tingly feeling around your mouth;
  • muscle weakness, tightness, or contraction, overactive reflexes;
  • fast or slow heart rate, weak pulse; or
  • confusion, uneven heart rate, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting;
  • diarrhea or constipation;
  • headache;
  • dizziness, anxiety, depressed mood; or
  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Mylotarg (gemtuzumab ozogamicin for injection) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects »

What is the most important information I should know about gemtuzumab (Mylotarg)?

You should not receive this medication if you are allergic to gemtuzumab

Before receiving gemtuzumab, tell your doctor if you have any type of infection, lung or breathing problems, liver or kidney disease, if you have ever received a stem cell transplant, or if you are being treated with other cancer medications.

Gemtuzumab can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can make it easier for you to bleed from an injury or get sick from being around others who are ill. To be sure your blood cells do not get too low, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Contact your doctor at once if you develop signs of infection such as fever, chills, sore throat, flu symptoms, easy bruising or bleeding (nosebleeds, bleeding gums), loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, mouth sores, or unusual weakness.

Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are being treated with gemtuzumab, and avoid coming into contact with anyone who has recently received a live vaccine.

Side Effects Centers

Mylotarg Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking gemtuzumab (Mylotarg)?

You should not receive this medication if you are allergic to gemtuzumab

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication:

  • any type of infection;
  • lung or breathing problems;
  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease;
  • if you have ever received a stem cell transplant; or
  • if you being treated with other cancer medications.

FDA pregnancy category D. Gemtuzumab can cause harm to an unborn baby or cause birth defects. Before you receive gemtuzumab, tell your doctor if you are pregnant. Use an effective form of birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether gemtuzumab passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How is gemtuzumab given (Mylotarg)?

Gemtuzumab is given as an injection through a needle placed into a vein. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting. The medicine must be given slowly through an IV infusion, and can take at least 2 hours to complete.

Gemtuzumab can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can make it easier for you to bleed from an injury or get sick from being around others who are ill.

Contact your doctor at once if you develop signs of infection such as fever, chills, sore throat, flu symptoms, easy bruising or bleeding (nosebleeds, bleeding gums), loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, mouth sores, or unusual weakness.

To be sure your blood cells do not get too low, your blood will need to be tested on a regular basis. Your kidney or liver function may also need to be tested. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Side Effects Centers

Mylotarg Patient Information including If I Miss a Dose

What happens if I miss a dose (Mylotarg)?

Contact your doctor if you miss an appointment for your gemtuzumab injection.

What happens if I overdose (Mylotarg)?

Since gemtuzumab is given by a healthcare professional, an overdose is not likely to occur.

Symptoms of a gemtuzumab overdose are not known.

What should I avoid while using gemtuzumab (Mylotarg)?

Do not receive a "live" vaccine while you are being treated with gemtuzumab, and avoid coming into contact with anyone who has recently received a live vaccine. The live vaccine may not work as well during this time, and may not fully protect you from disease. There is also chance that the virus could be passed on to you. Live vaccines include measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), oral polio, chickenpox (varicella), BCG (Bacillus Calmette and Guérin), and nasal flu vaccine.

What other drugs will affect gemtuzumab (Mylotarg)?

Tell your doctor about all other chemotherapy treatments you are receiving.

There may be other drugs that can interact with gemtuzumab. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about gemtuzumab.


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 2.05. Revision date: 12/15/2010.

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