Telbivudine (Tyzeka)
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Telbivudine (Tyzeka)

Tyzeka
(telbivudine)

WARNING

LACTIC ACIDOSIS/SEVERE HEPATOMEGALY WITH STEATOSIS & SEVERE ACUTE EXACERBATIONS OF HEPATITIS B

Lactic acidosis and severe hepatomegaly with steatosis, including fatal cases, have been reported with the use of nucleoside analogues alone or in combination with antiretrovirals [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Severe acute exacerbations of hepatitis B have been reported in patients who have discontinued anti-hepatitis B therapy, including Tyzeka. Hepatic function should be monitored closely with both clinical and laboratory follow-up for at least several months in patients who discontinue anti-hepatitis B therapy. If appropriate, resumption of anti-hepatitis B therapy may be warranted [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

DRUG DESCRIPTION

Tyzeka is the trade name for telbivudine, a synthetic thymidine nucleoside analogue with activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV). The chemical name for telbivudine is 1-((2S,4R,5S)-4-hydroxy-5hydroxymethyltetrahydrofuran-2-y1)-5-methyl-1H-pyrimidine-2,4-dione, or 1-(2-deoxy-β-L-ribofuranosyl)-5 -methyluracil. Telbivudine is the unmodified β-L enantiomer of the naturally occurring nucleoside, thymidine. Its molecular formula is C10H14N2O5, which corresponds to a molecular weight of 242.23. Telbivudine has the following structural formula:

Tyzeka (telbivudine) Structural Formula Illustration

Telbivudine is a white to slightly yellowish powder. Telbivudine is sparingly soluble in water (greater than 20 mg/mL), and very slightly soluble in absolute ethanol (0.7 mg/mL) and n-octanol (0.1 mg/mL).

Tyzeka film-coated tablets are available for oral administration in 600 mg strength. Tyzeka 600 mg film-coated tablets contain the following inactive ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, and sodium starch glycolate. The tablet coating contains titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol, talc and hypromellose.

Tyzeka oral solution is available for oral administration in 100 mg/5 mL strength. Tyzeka oral solution contains the following inactive ingredients: citric acid anhydrous, benzoic acid, passion fruit flavor, sodium saccharin, sodium hydroxide, and purified water. A 600 mg dose (30 mL) of Tyzeka oral solution contains approximately 47 mg of sodium.

What are the possible side effects of telbivudine (Tyzeka)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as:

  • muscle pain or weakness;
  • numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs;
  • trouble breathing;
  • feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Tyzeka »

What are the precautions when taking telbivudine (Tyzeka)?

Before taking telbivudine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: kidney problems, alcohol use.

This drug may make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are sure you can perform such activities safely.

Avoid alcohol because it may worsen dizziness and liver problems.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal...

Read All Potential Precautions of Tyzeka »

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

INDICATIONS

Chronic Hepatitis B

Tyzeka is indicated for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in adult patients with evidence of viral replication and either evidence of persistent elevations in serum aminotransferases (ALT or AST) or histologically active disease.

The following points should be considered when initiating therapy with Tyzeka:

  • This indication is based on virologic, serologic, biochemical and histologic responses in nucleoside treatment naïve adult patients with HBeAg positive and HBeAg negative chronic hepatitis B with compensated liver disease [see Clinical Studies].
  • For HBeAg-positive patients, Tyzeka should only be initiated in patients with HBV DNA less than 9 log10 copies/mL and ALT greater than or equal to 2x Upper Limit of Normal (ULN) prior to treatment.
  • For HBeAg-negative patients, Tyzeka should only be initiated in patients with HBV DNA less than 7 log10 copies/mL prior to treatment.
  • On-treatment response should guide continued therapy [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION and Microbiology].
  • Tyzeka has not been evaluated in patients co-infected with HIV, HCV or HDV.
  • Tyzeka has not been evaluated in liver transplant recipients or in patients with decompensated liver disease.
  • Tyzeka has not been studied in well-controlled trials for the treatment of patients with established nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant hepatitis B virus infection, but is expected to be cross-resistant to lamivudine [see Microbiology].
  • The safety and efficacy of Tyzeka have not been evaluated in Black/African American or Hispanic patients [see Use In Specific Populations].

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Adults and Adolescents (16 years of age and older)

Due to higher rates of resistance that may develop with longer term treatment among patients with incomplete viral suppression, treatment should only be initiated, if pre-treatment HBV DNA and ALT measurements are known, in the following patient populations:

For HBeAg-positive patients, HBV DNA should be less than 9 log10 copies/mL and ALT should be greater than or equal to 2x ULN prior to treatment with Tyzeka.

For HBeAg-negative patients, HBV DNA should be less than 7 log10 copies/mL prior to treatment with Tyzeka.

HBV DNA levels should be monitored at 24 weeks of treatment to assure complete viral suppression (HBV DNA less than 300 copies/mL). Alternate therapy should be initiated for patients who have detectable HBV DNA after 24 weeks of treatment. Optimal therapy should be guided by further resistance testing.

The recommended dose of Tyzeka for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B is 600 mg once daily, taken orally, with or without food.

Tyzeka oral solution (30 mL) may be considered for patients who have difficulty with swallowing tablets.

Renal Impairment

Tyzeka may be used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in patients with impaired renal function. No adjustment to the recommended dose of Tyzeka is necessary in patients whose creatinine clearance is greater than or equal to 50 mL/min. Adjustment of the total daily dose of Tyzeka oral solution or of the interval for administration of Tyzeka tablets is required in patients with creatinine clearance less than 50 mL/min including those with ESRD on hemodialysis (Table 1).

Table 1 : Dose Adjustment of Tyzeka in Patients with Renal Impairment

Creatinine Clearance
(mL/min)
Tyzeka Oral Solution Dose
(5 mL = 100 mg)
Tyzeka Tablet Dose
(1 tablet = 600 mg)
greater than or equal to 50 30 mL once daily 1 tablet every 24 hrs
30-49 20 mL once daily 1 tablet every 48 hrs
less than 30 (not requiring dialysis) 10 mL once daily 1 tablet every 72 hrs
ESRD 6 mL once daily 1 tablet every 96 hrs1
1When administered on hemodialysis days, Tyzeka should be administered after hemodialysis.

Hepatic Impairment

No adjustment to the recommended dose of Tyzeka is necessary in patients with hepatic impairment.

Duration of Therapy

For patients with incomplete viral suppression (HBV DNA greater than or equal to 300 copies/mL) after 24 weeks of treatment, alternate therapy should be instituted. HBV DNA should be monitored every 6 months to assure continued response. If patients test positive for HBV DNA at any time after their initial response, alternate treatment should be instituted. Optimal therapy should be guided by resistance testing.

The optimal duration of therapy with Tyzeka for patients with chronic hepatitis B is unknown.

HOW SUPPLIED

Dosage Forms And Strengths

Tablets

Tyzeka (telbivudine) 600 mg tablets are white to slightly yellowish film-coated, ovaloid-shaped tablets, imprinted with “LDT” on one side.

Oral Solution

Tyzeka (telbivudine) oral solution is a clear, colorless to pale yellow, passion fruit flavored liquid. Tyzeka oral solution contains 100 mg of telbivudine per 5 milliliters. Therefore, 30 mL of the oral solution provides a 600 mg dose of telbivudine.

Storage And Handling

Tablets

Tyzeka 600 mg tablets are white to slightly yellowish film-coated, ovaloid-shaped tablets, imprinted with “LDT” on one side.

Bottle of 30 tablets (NDC 0078-0538-15) with child-resistant closure.

Store Tyzeka tablets in original container at 25°C (77°F), excursions permitted to 15-30°C (59-86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].

Oral Solution

Tyzeka (telbivudine) oral solution is a clear, colorless to pale yellow, passion fruit flavored liquid. Tyzeka oral solution contains 100 mg of telbivudine per 5 milliliters.

Bottle containing 300 mL oral solution (NDC 0078-0539-85) with child-resistant closure and embossed dosing cup. The dosing cup is intended for measurement of Tyzeka oral solution only.

Store Tyzeka oral solution in original container at 25°C (77°F), excursions permitted to 15-30°C (59-86°F) [see USP Controlled Room Temperature]. Use within two months after opening the bottle. Do not freeze.

For all medical inquiries call: 1-877-8-Tyzeka (1-877-889-9352).

Keep this and all drugs out of the reach of children.

Distributed by: Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation East Hanover , New Jersey 07936. December 2011

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

SIDE EFFECTS

The following adverse reactions are discussed in other sections of the labeling:

Clinical Trial Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be compared directly to the rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Assessment of adverse reactions is primarily based on two studies (007 GLOBE and NV-02B-015) in which 1,699 subjects with chronic hepatitis B received double-blind treatment with Tyzeka 600 mg/day (n=847 subjects) or lamivudine (n=852 subjects) for 104 weeks. The median duration of therapy was 104 weeks for both treatment groups.

In the 104 week clinical studies, most adverse experiences reported with Tyzeka were classified as mild or moderate in severity and were not attributed to Tyzeka. Selected adverse events of any severity which were reported in greater than or equal to 3% of Tyzeka and lamivudine recipients are shown in Table 2. With the exception of increased creatine kinase (CK), which was reported more frequently among Tyzeka recipients, the adverse event profile was similar for the two drugs.

Table 2 : Selected Common Adverse Eventsa in Pooled Studies 007 GLOBE and NV-02B-015

Adverse Event
(Preferred Term)
Tyzeka
N=847
n (%)b
Lamivudine
N=852
n (%)b
Fatigue 106 (13) 95 (11)
CK increased 90 (11) 52 (6)
Headache 83 (10) 95 (11)
Cough 52 (6) 45 (5)
Diarrhea 50 (6) 46 (5)
Abdominal pain, upper 49 (6) 52 (6)
Nausea 45 (5) 40 (5)
Pharyngolaryngeal pain 38 (5) 31 (4)
Arthralgia 37 (4) 38 (5)
Pyrexia 34 (4) 27 (3)
Rash 33 (4) 21 (3)
Back pain 33 (4) 32 (4)
Dizziness 32 (4) 43 (5)
Abdominal pain 29 (3) 31 (4)
Myalgia 27 (3) 17 (2)
ALT increased 27 (3) 31 (4)
Dyspepsia 24 (3) 39 (5)
Insomnia 24 (3) 22 (3)
Abdominal distension 22 (3) 19 (2)
Pruritus 18 (2) 23 (3)
Hepatitis B exacerbation 17 (2) 36 (4)
a Adverse events reported in greater than or equal to 3% subjects in either treatment group
b n (%) = the number and proportion of subjects in whom adverse event was reported

Moderate to severe (Grade 2-4) adverse events were reported in 239/847 (28%) of Tyzeka recipients and 229/852 (27%) of lamivudine recipients. The profile of adverse events of moderate to severe intensity was similar in both treatment groups and no individual adverse event was reported in greater than 2% of subjects in either treatment group.

Discontinuations due to adverse events were reported in 4% of Tyzeka recipients and 4% of lamivudine recipients. The most common adverse events resulting in Tyzeka discontinuation included increased CK, nausea, diarrhea, fatigue, myalgia, and myopathy.

Peripheral neuropathy was reported as an adverse event in less than 1% (2/847) of subjects receiving Tyzeka monotherapy [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. Of Tyzeka-treated subjects less than 1% (5/847) were diagnosed with myopathy/myositis (presenting with muscular weakness) [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Laboratory Abnormalities

Frequencies of selected treatment-emergent laboratory abnormalities in the 007 GLOBE and NV-02B-015 studies are listed in Table 3.

Table 3 : Selected Treatment-Emergent Grade 3-4 Laboratory Abnormalitiesa in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B in the 104-Week Pooled 007 GLOBE and NV-02B-015 Studies

Test Tyzeka 600 mg
(n=847)
Lamivudine 100 mg
(n=852)
Creatine Kinase (CK) greater than 7.0 x ULN 13% 4%
ALT greater than 10.0 x ULN and 2.0 x baselineb 5% 8%
ALT greater than 3 x baseline 7% 13%
AST (SGOT) greater than 3.0 x baseline 6% 10%
Lipase greater than 2.5 x ULN 2% 4%
Amylase greater than 3.0 x ULN less than 1% less than 1%
Total Bilirubin greater than 5.0 x ULN less than 1% less than 1%
Neutropenia (ANC less than or equal to 749/mm³) 2% 2%
Thrombocytopenia (Platelets less than or equal to 49,999/mm³) less than 1% less than 1%
a On-treatment value worsened from baseline to Grade 3 or Grade 4 during therapy
b American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) definition of acute hepatitis flare

Creatine Kinase (CK) Elevations

Creatine kinase (CK) elevations were more frequent among subjects on Tyzeka treatment. By 104 weeks of treatment, Grade 1-4 CK elevations occurred in 79% of Tyzeka-treated subjects and 47% of lamivudine-treated subjects. Grade 3 or 4 CK elevations occurred in 13% of Tyzeka-treated subjects and 4% of lamivudine-treated subjects. Most CK elevations were asymptomatic, but the mean recovery time was longer for subjects on Tyzeka than subjects on lamivudine.

Among Tyzeka-treated subjects with Grade 1-4 CK elevations, 10% developed a musculoskeletal adverse event compared to 5% of lamivudine-treated subjects. A total of 2% (13/847) Tyzeka-treated subjects interrupted or discontinued study drug due to CK elevation or musculoskeletal adverse events1.

ALT Flares during Treatment

The incidence of ALT flares, defined as ALT greater than 10 x ULN and greater than 2 x baseline, was similar in the two treatment arms (3%) in the first six months. After week 24, ALT flares were reported less frequently in the Tyzeka arm (2%) compared to the lamivudine arm (5%). Periodic monitoring of hepatic function is recommended during chronic hepatitis B treatment.

Exacerbations of Hepatitis after Discontinuation of Treatment

In the subset of subjects who discontinued treatment prematurely for reasons other than efficacy, or who elected not to continue Tyzeka in another clinical trial, 9/154 (6%) Tyzeka-treated and 10/180 (6%) lamivudine-treated subjects experienced an exacerbation of hepatitis (ALT elevation greater than 2 x baseline and greater than 10 x ULN) in the 4-month post-treatment period.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been reported during postmarketing use of Tyzeka. Because these reactions were reported voluntarily from a population of unknown size, it is not possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to Tyzeka exposure.

Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders

Rhabdomyolysis

Nervous System Disorders

Paraesthesia, hypoaesthesia

Metabolism and Nutrition Disorders

Lactic acidosis

Read the Tyzeka (telbivudine) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects »

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Tyzeka is excreted mainly by passive diffusion so the potential for interactions between Tyzeka and other drugs eliminated by renal excretion is low. However, because Tyzeka is eliminated primarily by renal excretion, coadministration of Tyzeka with drugs that alter renal function may alter plasma concentrations of Tyzeka [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY].

A clinical trial investigating the combination of Tyzeka, 600 mg daily, with pegylated interferon alfa-2a, 180 micrograms once weekly by subcutaneous administration, indicates that this combination is associated with an increased risk of peripheral neuropathy occurrence and severity, in comparison to Tyzeka or pegylated interferon alfa-2a alone [see CONTRAINDICATIONS and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Drug Abuse And Dependence

Tyzeka is not a controlled substance and no potential for dependence has been observed.

REFERENCES

1 Includes the Preferred Terms: back pain, chest wall pain, non-cardiac chest pain, chest discomfort, flank pain, muscle cramp, muscular weakness, musculoskeletal pain, musculoskeletal chest pain, musculoskeletal discomfort, musculoskeletal stiffness, myalgia, myofascial pain syndrome, myopathy, myositis, neck pain, and pain in extremity.

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

WARNINGS

Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

PRECAUTIONS

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic acidosis and severe hepatomegaly with steatosis, including fatal cases, have been reported with the use of nucleoside analogues alone or in combination with antiretrovirals. Female gender, obesity and prolonged nucleoside exposure may be risk factors. Particular caution should be exercised when administering HBV nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors to patients with known risk factors for liver disease; however, cases have also been reported in patients with no known risk factors. Treatment with Tyzeka should be suspended in any patient who develops clinical or laboratory findings suggestive of lactic acidosis or pronounced hepatotoxicity (which may include hepatomegaly and steatosis even in the absence of marked transaminase elevations).

Exacerbations of Hepatitis B after Discontinuation of Treatment

Severe acute exacerbations of hepatitis B have been reported in patients who have discontinued anti-hepatitis B therapy, including Tyzeka. Hepatic function should be monitored closely with both clinical and laboratory follow-up for at least several months in patients who discontinue anti-hepatitis B therapy. If appropriate, resumption of anti-hepatitis B therapy may be warranted [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

Myopathy

Cases of myopathy/myositis have been reported with Tyzeka use several weeks to months after starting therapy. Myopathy has also been reported with some other drugs in this class. Rhabdomyolysis has been reported during postmarketing use of Tyzeka [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

Uncomplicated myalgia has been reported in Tyzeka-treated patients [see ADVERSE REACTIONS]. Myopathy, defined as persistent unexplained muscle aches and/or muscle weakness in conjunction with increases in creatine kinase (CK) values, should be considered in any patient with diffuse myalgias, muscle tenderness or muscle weakness. Among patients with Tyzeka-associated myopathy, no pattern with regard to the degree or timing of CK elevations has been observed. In addition, the predisposing factors for the development of myopathy among Tyzeka recipients are unknown. Patients should be advised to report promptly unexplained muscle aches, pain, tenderness or weakness. Tyzeka therapy should be interrupted if myopathy is suspected, and discontinued if myopathy is confirmed. It is unknown whether the risk of myopathy during treatment with drugs in this class is increased with concurrent administration of other drugs associated with myopathy, including but not limited to: corticosteroids, chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, certain HMGCoA reductase inhibitors, fibric acid derivatives, penicillamine, zidovudine, cyclosporine, erythromycin, niacin, and certain azole antifungals. Physicians initiating concomitant treatment with any drug associated with myopathy should monitor patients closely for any signs or symptoms of unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness.

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy has been reported with Tyzeka alone or in combination with pegylated interferon alfa-2a and other interferons. In one clinical trial, an increased risk and severity of peripheral neuropathy was observed with the combination use of Tyzeka 600mg daily and pegylated interferon alfa-2a 180 micrograms once weekly compared to Tyzeka or pegylated interferon alfa-2a alone [see CONTRAINDICATIONS and DRUG INTERACTIONS]. Such risk cannot be excluded for other dose regimens of pegylated interferon alfa-2a, or other alfa interferons (pegylated or standard). The safety and efficacy of Tyzeka in combination with pegylated interferons or other interferons for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B has not been demonstrated. Patients should be advised to report any numbness, tingling, and/or burning sensations in the arms and/or legs, with or without gait disturbance. Tyzeka therapy should be interrupted if peripheral neuropathy is suspected, and discontinued if peripheral neuropathy is confirmed [see ADVERSE REACTIONS].

Patient Counseling Information

Patients should remain under the care of a physician while taking Tyzeka. They should discuss any new symptoms or concurrent medications with their physician.

Patients should be advised to report promptly unexplained muscle weakness, tenderness or pain.

Patients should be advised to report promptly any numbness, tingling, and/or burning sensations in the arms and/or legs, with or without difficulty walking.

Patients should be advised that Tyzeka is not a cure for hepatitis B, that the long-term treatment benefits of Tyzeka are unknown at this time. In particular, the relationship of initial treatment response to outcomes such as hepatocellular carcinoma and decompensated cirrhosis is unknown.

Patients should be informed that deterioration of liver disease may occur in some cases if treatment is discontinued, and that they should discuss any change in regimen with their physician.

Patients should be advised that treatment with Tyzeka has not been shown to reduce the risk of transmission of HBV to others through sexual contact or blood contamination. HBV prevention strategies should be discussed with patients, including safe sexual practices, and avoidance of needle sharing or sharing any personal items which may contain residual blood or body fluids, such as razor blades or toothbrushes. Additionally, a vaccine is available for prevention of hepatitis B infection in susceptible individuals.

Patients on a low sodium diet should be advised that Tyzeka oral solution contains approximately 47 mg of sodium per 600 mg dose (30 mL).

Patients should be advised to dispose of unused or expired Tyzeka by using a community pharmaceutical take-back disposal program, or by placing unused Tyzeka in a closed container, such as a sealed bag, into household trash. All identifying information should be removed from the original Tyzeka container prior to disposal.

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Telbivudine has shown no carcinogenic potential. Long term oral carcinogenicity studies with telbivudine were negative in mice and rats at exposures up to 14 times those observed in humans at the therapeutic dose of 600 mg/day.

There was no evidence of genotoxicity based on in-vitro or in-vivo tests. Telbivudine was not mutagenic in the Ames bacterial reverse mutation assay using S. typhimurium and E. coli strains with or without metabolic activation. Telbivudine was not clastogenic in mammalian-cell gene mutation assays, including human lymphocyte cultures and an assay with Chinese hamster ovary cells with or without metabolic activation. Furthermore, telbivudine showed no effect in an in-vivo micronucleus study in mice.

Effects on fertility were studied in rats administered telbivudine as juveniles or adults. Juvenile rats were treated with telbivudine at doses of 0, 250, 1000, and 2000 mg/kg/day from post natal days 14 to 70. These rats were mated following a 5 week drug-free recovery period. Up to 50% reduction of fertility was associated with doses 1000 mg/kg/day and higher, which was equivalent to a systemic exposure approximately 7.5 times that achieved in humans at the therapeutic dose. The no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for effects on fertility or mating parameters was 250 mg/kg/day, which was equivalent to systemic exposure levels 2.5 to 2.8 times that achieved in humans at the therapeutic dose. In contrast, such reduction of fertility was absent in adult rats treated with telbivudine at doses up to 2000 mg/kg/day, equivalent to a systemic exposure approximately 14 times that achieved in humans at the therapeutic dose.

Use In Specific Populations

Pregnancy

Category B: Telbivudine is not teratogenic and has shown no adverse effects in developing embryos and fetuses in preclinical studies. Studies in pregnant rats and rabbits showed that telbivudine crosses the placenta. Developmental toxicity studies revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus in rats and rabbits at doses up to 1000 mg/kg/day, providing exposure levels 6- and 37-times higher, respectively, than those observed with the 600 mg/day dose in humans.

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies of Tyzeka in pregnant women. Because animal reproductive toxicity studies are not always predictive of human response, Tyzeka should be used during pregnancy only if potential benefits outweigh the risks.

Pregnancy Registry: To monitor fetal outcomes of pregnant women exposed to Tyzeka, healthcare providers are encouraged to register such patients in the Antiretroviral Pregnancy Registry by calling 1-800-258-4263.

Labor and Delivery

There are no studies in pregnant women and no data on the effect of Tyzeka on transmission of HBV from mother to infant. Therefore, appropriate interventions should be used to prevent neonatal acquisition of HBV infection.

Nursing Mothers

Telbivudine is excreted in the milk of rats. It is not known whether Tyzeka is excreted in human milk. Mothers should be instructed not to breast-feed if they are receiving Tyzeka.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness of Tyzeka in pediatric patients have not been established.

Geriatric Use

Clinical studies of Tyzeka did not include sufficient numbers of subjects aged 65 and older to determine whether they respond differently from younger subjects. In general, caution should be exercised when prescribing Tyzeka to elderly patients, considering the greater frequency of decreased renal function due to concomitant disease or other drug therapy. Renal function should be monitored in elderly patients, and dosage adjustments should be made accordingly [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Renal Impairment

Tyzeka is eliminated primarily by renal excretion, therefore dose regimen adjustment is recommended in patients with creatinine clearance less than 50 mL/min, including patients with ESRD requiring hemodialysis [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION and CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY].

Liver Transplant Recipients

The safety and efficacy of Tyzeka in liver transplant recipients has not been evaluated. The steady-state pharmacokinetics of Tyzeka was not altered following multiple dose administration in combination with cyclosporine. If Tyzeka treatment is determined to be necessary for a liver transplant recipient who has received or is receiving an immunosuppressant that may affect renal function, such as cyclosporine or tacrolimus, renal function should be monitored both before and during treatment with Tyzeka [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Co-Infected Patients

Tyzeka has not been investigated in co-infected hepatitis B patients (e.g., patients co-infected with HIV, HCV or HDV).

Racial/Ethnic Minorities

The safety and efficacy of Tyzeka have not been evaluated in Black/African American or Hispanic patients. It is not known if safety and efficacy can be extrapolated from studied populations.

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

OVERDOSE

There is no information on intentional overdose of Tyzeka, but one subject experienced an unintentional and asymptomatic overdose. Healthy subjects who received Tyzeka doses up to 1800 mg/day for 4 days had no increase in or unexpected adverse events. A maximum tolerated dose for Tyzeka has not been determined. In the event of an overdose, Tyzeka should be discontinued, the patient must be monitored for evidence of toxicity, and appropriate general supportive treatment applied as necessary.

In case of overdosage, hemodialysis may be considered. Within 2 hours, following a single 200 mg dose of telbivudine, a 4-hour hemodialysis session removed approximately 23% of the telbivudine dose.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Combination of Tyzeka with pegylated interferon alfa-2a is contraindicated because of increased risk of peripheral neuropathy [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS and DRUG INTERACTIONS]

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism of Action

Tyzeka is an antiviral drug [see Microbiology].

Pharmacodynamics

In a randomized, partially single-blinded, placebo and active-controlled, four-period crossover study, 53 healthy subjects were administered Tyzeka 600 mg, a supratherapeutic Tyzeka 1800 mg dose, placebo, and moxifloxacin 400 mg. After 7 days of dosing, Tyzeka did not prolong the QT interval. The maximum placebo-adjusted mean (upper 1-side 95% CI) change from baseline in QTcF on day 7 were 3.4 msec (5.9 msec) for the 600 mg and 4.4 msec (6.9 msec) for the 1800 mg dosing regimens.

Pharmacokinetics in Adults

The single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of Tyzeka were evaluated in healthy subjects and in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Tyzeka pharmacokinetics are similar between both populations.

Absorption and Bioavailability

Following oral administration of Tyzeka 600 mg once-daily in healthy subjects (n=12), steady state peak plasma concentration (Cmax) was 3.69 ± 1.25 μg/mL (mean ± SD) which occurred between 1 and 4 hours (median 2 hours), AUC was 26.1 ± 7.2 μg h/mL (mean ± SD), and trough plasma concentrations (Ctrough) were approximately 0.2-0.3 μg/mL. Steady state was achieved after approximately 5 to 7 days of once-daily administration with ~1.5-fold accumulation, suggesting an effective half-life of ~15 hours.

Effects of Food on Oral Absorption

Tyzeka absorption and exposure were unaffected when a single 600 mg dose was administered with a high-fat (~55 g), high-calorie (~950 kcal) meal. Tyzeka may be taken with or without food.

Distribution

In-vitro binding of telbivudine to human plasma proteins is low (3.3%). After oral dosing, the estimated apparent volume of distribution is in excess of total body water, suggesting that telbivudine is widely distributed into tissues. Telbivudine was equally partitioned between plasma and blood cells.

Metabolism and Elimination

No metabolites of telbivudine were detected following administration of [14C]-telbivudine in humans. Telbivudine is not a substrate, or inhibitor of the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme system.

After reaching the peak concentration, plasma concentrations of Tyzeka declined in a biexponential manner with a terminal elimination half-life (T½) of 40-49 hours. Tyzeka is eliminated primarily by urinary excretion of unchanged drug. The renal clearance of Tyzeka approaches normal glomerular filtration rate suggesting that passive diffusion is the main mechanism of excretion. Approximately 42% of the dose is recovered in the urine over 7 days following a single 600 mg oral dose of Tyzeka. Because renal excretion is the predominant route of elimination, patients with moderate to severe renal dysfunction and those undergoing hemodialysis require a dose regimen adjustment [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Special Populations

Gender: There are no significant gender-related differences in Tyzeka pharmacokinetics.

Race: There are no significant race-related differences in Tyzeka pharmacokinetics.

Pediatrics and Geriatrics: Pharmacokinetic studies have not been conducted in children or elderly subjects.

Renal Impairment: Single-dose pharmacokinetics of Tyzeka have been evaluated in subjects (without chronic hepatitis B) with various degrees of renal impairment (as assessed by creatinine clearance). Based on the results shown in Table 4, adjustment of the dose regimen for Tyzeka is recommended in patients with creatinine clearance of less than 50 mL/min [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Table 4 : Pharmacokinetic Parameters (mean ± SD) of Tyzeka in Subjects with Various Degrees of Renal Function

  Renal Function (Creatinine Clearance in mL/min)
Normal (greater than 80) (n=8) 600 mg Mild (50-80) (n=8) 600 mg Moderate (30-49) (n=8) 400 mg Severe (less than 30) (n=6) 200 mg ESRD/Hemodialysis (n=6) 200 mg
Cmax (µg/mL) 3.4±0.9 3.2±0.9 2.8±1.3 1.6±0.8 2.1±0.9
AUC0-INF (μg•hr/mL) 28.5±9.6 32.5±10.1 36.0±13.2 32.5±13.2 67.4±36.9
CLRENAL (L/h) 7.6±2.9 5.0±1.2 2.6±1.2 0.7±0.4  

Renally Impaired Subjects on Hemodialysis: Hemodialysis (up to 4 hours) reduces systemic Tyzeka exposure by approximately 23%. Following dose regimen adjustment for creatinine clearance [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION], no additional dose modification is necessary during routine hemodialysis. When administered on hemodialysis days, Tyzeka should be administered after hemodialysis.

Hepatic Impairment: The pharmacokinetics of Tyzeka following a single 600 mg dose have been studied in subjects (without chronic hepatitis B) with various degrees of hepatic impairment. There were no changes in Tyzeka pharmacokinetics in hepatically impaired subjects compared to unimpaired subjects. Results of these studies indicate that no dosage adjustment is necessary for patients with hepatic impairment.

Drug Interactions

Drug-drug interaction studies show that lamivudine, adefovir dipivoxil, cyclosporine, pegylated interferon alfa2a and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate do not alter Tyzeka pharmacokinetics. In addition, Tyzeka does not alter the pharmacokinetics of lamivudine, adefovir dipivoxil, cyclosporine, or tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. No definitive conclusion could be drawn regarding the effects of Tyzeka on the pharmacokinetics of pegylated interferon alfa-2a due to the high inter-individual variability of pegylated interferon alfa-2a concentrations. At concentrations up to 12 times that in humans, telbivudine did not inhibit in-vitro metabolism mediated by any of the following human hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes known to be involved in human medicinal product metabolism: 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D26, 2E1, and 3A4. Based on the above results and the known elimination pathway of telbivudine, the potential for CYP450-mediated interactions involving telbivudine with other medicinal products is low.

Microbiology

Mechanism of Action

Telbivudine is a synthetic thymidine nucleoside analogue with activity against HBV DNA polymerase. It is phosphorylated by cellular kinases to the active triphosphate form, which has an intracellular half-life of 14 hours. Telbivudine 5'-triphosphate inhibits HBV DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase) by competing with the natural substrate, thymidine 5'-triphosphate. Incorporation of telbivudine 5'-triphosphate into viral DNA causes DNA chain termination. Telbivudine is an inhibitor of both HBV first strand (EC50 value = 1.3 ± 1.6 μM) and second strand synthesis (EC50 value = 0.2 ± 0.2 μM). Telbivudine 5'-triphosphate at concentrations up to 100 μM did not inhibit human cellular DNA polymerases α, β, or γ. No appreciable mitochondrial toxicity was observed in HepG2 cells treated with telbivudine at concentrations up to 10 μM.

Antiviral Activity in Cell Culture

The antiviral activity of telbivudine was assessed in the HBV-expressing human hepatoma cell line 2.2.15, as well as in primary duck hepatocytes infected with duck hepatitis B virus. The concentration of telbivudine that effectively inhibited 50% of viral DNA synthesis (EC50) in both systems was approximately 0.2 μM. The anti-HBV activity of telbivudine was additive with adefovir in cell culture, and was not antagonized by the HIV NRTIs didanosine and stavudine. Telbivudine is not active against HIV-1 (EC50 value greater than 100 μM) and was not antagonistic to the anti-HIV activity of abacavir, didanosine, emtricitabine, lamivudine, stavudine, tenofovir, or zidovudine. The absence of activity of telbivudine against HIV has not been evaluated in clinical trials.

Resistance

In an as-treated analysis of the Phase III global registration trial (NV-02B-007 GLOBE study), 59% (252/430) of treatment-naïve HBeAg-positive and 89% (202/227) of treatment-naïve HBeAg-negative subjects receiving Tyzeka 600 mg once daily achieved non-detectable serum HBV DNA levels (less than 300 copies/mL) by Week 52. Of those who continued treatment beyond Week 52, 58% (243/418) and 85% (190/224) of HBeAgpositive and HBeAg-negative Tyzeka recipients, respectively, had undetectable HBV DNA at Week 104 (or at the end of dosing in treatment Year 2).

The cumulative frequency of genotypic resistance (emergence of the rtM204I/V substitution) to Tyzeka based on an as-treated analysis of HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative subjects at Weeks 52 and 104 was 7% and 22%, respectively. Genotypic analysis of paired baseline and Tyzeka-treatment failure isolates from 182 evaluable subjects with amplifiable HBV DNA and greater than or equal to 16 weeks of treatment showed that the rtM204I/V substitution was associated with virologic failure (HBV DNA greater than or equal to 1,000 copies/mL) and virologic rebound (greater than or equal to 1 log10 increase above nadir). The rtM204I substitution was the most frequent substitution, detectable in isolates from 143/182 (79%) of evaluable subjects, and was frequently found with substitutions rtL80I/V and rtL180M. The rtM204I substitution was found infrequently with rtV27A, rtL82M, rtV173L, rtT184I/S, rtA200V, rtL229F/V/W, and rtR289K substitutions. The HBV of 16 subjects developed rtA181S/T amino acid substitutions while receiving Tyzeka. Eight of these 16 subjects had outgrowth of HBV expressing an rtM204I/V substitution without the rtA181 substitution and 1 subject's HBV had both the rtM204I and rtA181T substitutions.

Subjects with higher baseline viral load had higher rates of genotypic resistance to Tyzeka, while subjects who achieved HBV DNA levels less than 300 copies/mL at Week 24 had lower rates of genotypic resistance to Tyzeka. By Week 104, 32% (95/293) of HBeAg-positive subjects with baseline viral DNA levels greater than or equal to 9 log10 copies/mL developed genotypic resistance to Tyzeka, compared to 15% (20/136) of the subjects with viral DNA levels less than 9 log10 copies/mL. In HBeAg-negative subjects, 17% (22/132) of the subjects with baseline viral DNA levels greater than or equal to 7 log10 copies/mL developed genotypic resistance to Tyzeka, compared to 5% (5/95) of the subjects with viral DNA levels less than 7 log10 copies/mL. By Week 104, 41% (97/239) of HBeAg-positive subjects who failed to achieve viral DNA levels less than 300 copies/mL at Week 24 developed genotypic resistance to Tyzeka, compared to 9% (18/190) of the subjects with non-detectable serum HBV DNA levels (less than 300 copies/mL) at Week 24. In HBeAg-negative subjects, 35% (15/43) of the subjects who failed to achieve viral DNA levels less than 300 copies/mL at Week 24 developed genotypic resistance to Tyzeka, compared to 7% (12/184) of the subjects with non-detectable serum HBV DNA levels (less than 300 copies/mL) at Week 24.

Cross-Resistance

Cross-resistance has been observed among HBV nucleoside analogues. In cell-based assays, lamivudineresistant HBV strains expressing either the rtM204I substitution or the rtL180M/rtM204V double substitution had greater than or equal to 1,000-fold reduced susceptibility to telbivudine. Telbivudine retained wild-type phenotypic activity (1.2-fold reduction) against the lamivudine resistance-associated substitution rtM204V alone. The efficacy of telbivudine against HBV harboring the rtM204V substitution has not been established in clinical trials.

HBV encoding the adefovir resistance-associated substitution rtA181V showed 3- to 5-fold reduced susceptibility to telbivudine in cell culture. The rtA181S and rtA181T substitutions conferred 2.7- and 3.5-fold reductions in susceptibility to telbivudine, respectively. The rtA181T substitution is associated with decreased clinical response in patients with HBV treated with adefovir and entecavir. HBV encoding the adefovir resistance-associated substitution rtN236T remained susceptible to telbivudine.

Clinical Studies

Clinical Experience in Nucleoside-Naïve Adults

The safety and efficacy of long-term (104-week) Tyzeka treatment were evaluated in one active-controlled, clinical study (NV-02B-007 GLOBE Study) that included 1,367 subjects with chronic hepatitis B and a smaller supportive study (NV-02B-015) that included 332 subjects. Subjects were 16 years of age or older, with chronic hepatitis B, evidence of HBV infection with viral replication (HBsAg-positive, HBeAg-positive or HBeAg-negative, HBV DNA detectable by a PCR assay), and elevated ALT levels greater than or equal to 1.3 x ULN, no evidence of hepatic decompensation, and chronic inflammation on liver biopsy compatible with chronic viral hepatitis.

NV-02B-007 GLOBE Study

The Week 52 and Week 104 results of the 007 GLOBE study are summarized below.

The 007 GLOBE study was a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, multinational study of Tyzeka 600 mg once daily compared to lamivudine 100 mg once daily for a treatment period of 104 weeks in 1,367 (n= 680 Tyzeka; n=687 lamivudine) nucleoside-naïve chronic hepatitis B HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative subjects. The primary data analysis was conducted after all subjects had reached Week 52.

HBeAg-positive Subjects: (n= 458 Tyzeka; n= 463 lamivudine) The mean age of subjects was 32 years, 74% were male, 82% were Asian, 12% were Caucasian, and 6% had previously received alfa-interferon therapy. At baseline, subjects had a mean Knodell Necroinflammatory Score greater than or equal to 7; mean serum HBV DNA as measured by Roche COBAS Amplicor® PCR assay was 9.52 log10 copies/mL; and mean serum ALT was 153 IU/L. Pre- and post-liver biopsy samples were adequate for 86% of subjects.

HBeAg-negative Subjects: (n=222 Tyzeka; n= 224 lamivudine)The mean age of subjects was 43 years, 77% were male, 65% were Asian, 23% were Caucasian, and 11% had previously received alfa-interferon therapy. At baseline, subjects had a mean Knodell Necroinflammatory Score greater than or equal to 7; mean serum HBV DNA as measured by Roche COBAS Amplicor® PCR assay was 7.54 log10 copies/mL; and mean serum ALT was 140 IU/L. Pre- and post-liver biopsy samples were adequate for 92% of subjects.

Clinical Results

Clinical and virologic efficacy endpoints were evaluated separately in the HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative subject populations.

The primary endpoint of Therapeutic Response at Week 52 was a composite endpoint requiring suppression of HBV DNA to less than 5 log10 copies/mL in conjunction with either loss of serum HBeAg or ALT normalization. Key secondary endpoints included histologic response, ALT normalization, and measures of virologic response.

At Week 52, in HBeAg-positive patients, 75% of Tyzeka subjects and 67% of lamivudine subjects had a Therapeutic Response; in HBeAg-negative patients 75% of Tyzeka subjects and 77% of lamivudine subjects had a Therapeutic Response.

Analysis of the histological response at Week 52 is shown in Table 5.

Table 5 : Histological Improvement and Change in Ishak Fibrosis Score at Week 52 (007 GLOBE Study)

  HBeAg-positive (n=797) HBeAg-negative (n=417)
Tyzeka 600 mg
(n=399)1
Lamivudine 100 mg
(n=398)1
Tyzeka 600 mg
(n=205)1
Lamivudine 100 mg
(n=212)1
Histologic Response2
  Improvement 69% 60% 69% 68%
  No Improvement 19% 26% 23% 25%
  Missing Week 52 Biopsy 12% 15% 8% 7%
Ishak Fibrosis Score3
  Improvement 41% 46% 48% 44%
  No Change 39% 32% 34% 43%
  Worsening 9% 7% 10% 5%
  Missing Week 52 Biopsy 12% 15% 8% 7%
1 Patients with greater than or equal to one dose of study drug with evaluable baseline liver biopsies and baseline Knodell Necroinflammatory Score greater than or equal to 2
2 Histologic Response defined as greater than or equal to 2 point decrease in Knodell Necroinflammatory Score from baseline with no worsening of the Knodell Fibrosis Score
3 For Ishak Fibrosis Score, improvement defined as greater than or equal to a 1-point reduction in Ishak Fibrosis Score from baseline to Week 52

Subjects were eligible to continue blinded treatment to Week 104. In the ITT population, 624/680 (92%) Tyzeka recipients and 599/687 (87%) lamivudine recipients completed study treatment to Week 104. At Week 104, in HBeAg-positive patients, 63% of Tyzeka subjects and 48% of lamivudine subjects had a Therapeutic Response, while in HBeAg-negative patients 78% of Tyzeka subjects and 66% of lamivudine subjects had a Therapeutic Response.

Selected virologic, biochemical, and serologic outcome measures at Weeks 52 and 104 are shown in Table 6.

Table 6 : Virological, Biochemical and Serologic Endpoints at Weeks 52 and 104 (007 GLOBE Study)

Response Parameter HBeAg-positive (n=921) HBeAg-negative (n=446)
Tyzeka 600 mg
(n=458)
Lamivudine100 mg
(n=463)
Tyzeka 600 mg
(n=222)
Lamivudine 100 mg
(n=224)
Week 52 Week 104 Week 52 Week 104 Week 52 Week 104 Week 52 Week 104
Mean HBV DNA Reduction from Baseline (log10 copies/mL)± SEM1 -6.45(0.11) -5.74(0.15) -5.54(0.11) -4.42(0.15) -5.23(0.13) -5.00(0.15) -4.40(0.13) -4.17(0.16)
% Subjects HBV DNA Negative by PCR 60% 56% 40% 39% 88% 82% 71% 57%
ALT Normalization2 77% 70% 75% 62% 74% 78% 79% 70%
HBeAg Seroconversion3 23% 30% 22% 25% NA NA NA NA
HBeAg Loss3 26% 35% 23% 29% NA NA NA NA
1 Roche COBAS Amplicor® Assay (LLOQ less than or equal to 300 copies/mL).
2ALT normalization assessed only in subjects with ALT greater than ULN at baseline.
3 HBeAg seroconversion and loss assessed only in subjects with detectable HBeAg at baseline.

Patients who achieved non-detectable HBV DNA levels at 24 weeks were more likely to undergo e-antigen seroconversion, achieve undetectable levels of HBV DNA, normalize ALT, and were less likely to develop resistance at one and two years.

Study NV-02B-015

The efficacy results of the 007 GLOBE study were supported by results of study NV-02B-015. This was a Phase III, randomized, double-blind, study of Tyzeka 600 mg once daily compared to lamivudine 100 mg once daily for a treatment period of 104 weeks in 332 (n=167 Tyzeka; n=165 lamivudine) nucleoside-naïve chronic hepatitis B HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative Chinese subjects. The primary efficacy endpoint was serum HBV DNA reduction from baseline. In this study the composite endpoint Therapeutic Response was a key secondary endpoint. Histological response was not assessed as an outcome measure in this study.

Clinical Results

Among HBeAg-positive subjects (n=147 Tyzeka; n=143 lamivudine) results for key endpoints at Week 104 included Therapeutic Response (66% vs. 41%), mean HBV DNA reduction (-5.47 vs. -3.97 log10 copies/mL), HBV DNA PCR negativity (58% vs. 34%), ALT normalization (73% vs. 59%), HBeAg loss (40% vs. 28%) and HBeAg seroconversion (29% vs. 20%), for Tyzeka and lamivudine, respectively. Because the number of HBeAg-negative subjects in this study was small (n=42), definitive conclusions could not be drawn regarding efficacy outcomes in this subpopulation.

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

PATIENT INFORMATION

MEDICATION GUIDE

Tyzeka®
(Tie-zee'-ka)
(telbivudine) Tablets

Tyzeka
(telbivudine) Oral Solution

Read this Medication Guide carefully before you start taking Tyzeka and each time you refill your prescription. There may be new information. The information contained in this Medication Guide does not take the place of talking with your healthcare provider about your medical condition or treatment.

What is the most important information I should know about Tyzeka?

Tyzeka can cause serious side effects, including:

Lactic Acidosis (build-up of an acid in the blood). Lactic acidosis can occur in people who take medicines like Tyzeka (a nucleoside analogue). Lactic acidosis is a serious medical emergency that can lead to death. Lactic acidosis must be treated in the hospital. Women, and people who are obese, or who have taken nucleoside analogues like Tyzeka for long periods of time may be at higher risk for lactic acidosis.

Lactic acidosis can be hard to identify early, because the symptoms could seem like symptoms of other health problems. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms which could be signs of lactic acidosis:

  • You feel very weak or tired.
  • You have unusual (not normal) muscle pain.
  • You have trouble breathing.
  • You have stomach pain with nausea and vomiting.
  • You feel cold, especially in your arms and legs.
  • You feel dizzy or light-headed.
  • You have a fast or irregular heartbeat.

Liver problems. Serious liver problems have occurred in some people who take medicines like Tyzeka. This includes liver enlargement (hepatomegaly) and fat in the liver (steatosis).

Call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of these signs of liver problems:

  • Your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice).
  • Your urine turns dark.
  • Your bowel movements (stools) turn light in color.
  • You do not feel like eating food for several days or longer.
  • You feel sick to your stomach (nausea).
  • You have lower stomach pain.

Muscle problems (myopathy). Tyzeka can cause muscle problems, including unexplained muscle pain, muscle weakness or muscle tenderness. Serious muscle problems can occur, including muscle breakdown (rhabdomyolysis). Muscle breakdown can lead to kidney damage. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have unexplained muscle aches, pain, tenderness, or weakness.

Nerve problems. People who take Tyzeka alone or with any type of injectable interferon product can have nerve problems such as continuing numbness, tingling, burning sensations in the arms or legs (peripheral neuropathy), or problems walking. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms.

If you take Tyzeka with any type of injectable interferon product, your chance of having nerve problems may be higher and the nerve problems may be more severe. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are also being treated with any type of injectable interferon for chronic hepatitis B or C. Check with your healthcare provider if you are not sure whether you are taking an injectable interferon product.

Worsening of your hepatitis B infection. Your hepatitis B infection may get worse or become very serious if you stop taking Tyzeka.

  • Take your Tyzeka exactly as prescribed.
  • Do not let your Tyzeka run out. Refill your prescription or talk to your healthcare provider before your Tyzeka is all gone.
  • Do not stop taking your Tyzeka without talking to your healthcare provider.

Your healthcare provider will need to monitor your health and do regular blood tests to check your liver if you stop taking Tyzeka. Tell your healthcare provider right away about any new or unusual symptoms that happen after you stop taking Tyzeka.

What is Tyzeka?

Tyzeka is a prescription medicine used for chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in people 16 years of age and older who also have active liver damage.

  • Tyzeka will not cure HBV.
  • Tyzeka may lower the amount of HBV in the body.
  • Tyzeka may lower the ability of HBV to multiply and infect new liver cells.
  • Tyzeka may improve the condition of your liver.

It is not known if Tyzeka is safe and effective in children younger than age 16.

Who should not take Tyzeka?

Do not take Tyzeka when you are also taking Pegasys® (pegylated interferon alfa-2a) since your chance of having nerve problems may be higher and the nerve problems may be more severe.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before I take Tyzeka?

Tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have kidney problems. You may need a lower dose of Tyzeka.
  • have any allergies.
  • are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if Tyzeka is safe to use during pregnancy. It is not known whether Tyzeka helps prevent a pregnant mother from passing HBV to her baby. You and your healthcare provider will need to decide if Tyzeka is right for you. If you use Tyzeka while you are pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider.
  • are breast-feeding. It is not known if Tyzeka can pass into your breast milk or if it can harm your baby. Do not breast-feed if you are taking Tyzeka.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tyzeka may interact with other medicines that leave the body through the kidneys.

Especially tell your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are also being treated with Pegasys® (pegylated interferon alfa-2a), or any type of injectable interferon product for chronic hepatitis B or C. Tyzeka must not be taken with Pegasys® (pegylated interferon alfa-2a) (See “What is the most important information I should know about Tyzeka?” and “Who should not take Tyzeka?”)

Tyzeka Oral Solution contains sodium. If you are on a low sodium diet, ask your healthcare provider for advice. Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of your medicines with you to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist.

How should I take Tyzeka?

Tyzeka does not stop you from spreading HBV to others by sex, sharing needles, or being exposed to your blood. Talk with your healthcare provider about safe sexual practices that protect your partner. Never share needles. Do not share personal items that can have blood or body fluids on them, like toothbrushes or razor blades. A shot (vaccine) is available to protect people at risk from becoming infected with HBV, such as partners of patients with HBV.

  • Take Tyzeka exactly as prescribed. Your healthcare provider will tell you how much Tyzeka to take. The usual dose of Tyzeka is 600 mg one time each day. Your dose may be lower if you have kidney problems.
  • Tyzeka may be taken with or without food.
  • To help you remember to take your Tyzeka, try to take it at the same time each day.
    • Do not change your dose or stop taking Tyzeka without talking to your healthcare provider first. See “What is the most important information I should know about Tyzeka?”
    • Tell your healthcare provider if you have trouble swallowing tablets. Tyzeka also comes as a liquid (oral solution) that you can drink. See the end of this Medication Guide for detailed Patient Instructions for Use for the right way to take Tyzeka oral solution.
    • If you forget to take Tyzeka, take it as soon as you remember and then take your next dose at the regular time. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose. Do not take two doses at the same time. Call your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are not sure what to do.
    • If you take more than your prescribed dose of Tyzeka, call your healthcare provider right away.

It is important to stay under your healthcare provider's care while taking Tyzeka. Your healthcare provider will regularly test the level of the hepatitis B virus in your blood.

What are the possible side effects of Tyzeka?

Tyzeka can cause serious side effects. (See “What is the most important information I should know about Tyzeka?”).

Common side effects of Tyzeka include:

  • tiredness
  • headache
  • cough
  • diarrhea
  • stomach area (abdominal) pain
  • nausea
  • sore throat
  • joint pain
  • fever
  • skin rash
  • back pain
  • dizziness
  • muscle aches
  • upset stomach
  • trouble sleeping
  • stomach area (abdominal) swelling
  • certain abnormal blood tests

Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of Tyzeka. Your healthcare provider or pharmacist can give you a more complete list.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800FDA-1088.

How should I store Tyzeka?

  • Store Tyzeka Tablets and Oral Solution in the original bottle at room temperature, 59°F to 86°F (15° to 30°C).
  • Do not store Tyzeka Tablets in a damp place such as a bathroom medicine cabinet or near the kitchen sink.
  • Do not freeze Tyzeka Oral Solution.
  • Use Tyzeka Oral Solution within 2 months after opening the bottle.
  • Keep the bottle closed tightly.
  • Throw away Tyzeka when it is outdated or no longer needed by taking Tyzeka to a community take-back disposal program, if available, or by placing Tyzeka in a closed container (such as a sealed bag) in the household trash. Remove all identifying information from the original Tyzeka container before throwing it out.

Keep Tyzeka and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about Tyzeka

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. Do not use Tyzeka for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Tyzeka to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them.

This Medication Guide summarizes the most important information about Tyzeka. If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for information about Tyzeka that is written for healthcare professionals. For more information call 1-877-889-9352 or go to www.Tyzeka.com.

What are the ingredients in Tyzeka?

Active Ingredient: telbivudine

Inactive Ingredients in Tyzeka Tablets: colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, sodium starch glycolate. The tablet coating contains titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol, talc and hypromellose.

Inactive Ingredients in Tyzeka Oral Solution: citric acid anhydrous, benzoic acid, passion fruit flavor, sodium saccharin, sodium hydroxide, and purified water. A 600 mg dose (30 mL) of Tyzeka oral solution contains about 47 mg of sodium.

Instructions for Use

Make sure that you read, understand and follow these instructions carefully so that you take Tyzeka oral solution the right way.

1. Supplies needed to take a dose of Tyzeka oral solution

To take your dose of Tyzeka you will need:

  1. Bottle containing the medicine.
  2. Child-resistant cap.
  3. Oral dosing cup with 6, 10, 20 and 30 mL markings.

See Figure 1.

Figure 1

Supplies needed to take a dose of Tyzeka oral solution - Illustration

2. Important Information

  • Do not pour any extra medicine back into the bottle. This will help prevent contamination.
  • Close the bottle right away after use.
  • Clean the dosing cup with clean water after each use.
  • Keep the dosing cup dry between uses.
  • The dosing cup is intended for measurement of Tyzeka oral solution only.

3. Prepare a dose of Tyzeka oral solution using the dosing cup

  1. Remove the dosing cup from the cap.
  2. Press down and turn the child-resistant cap at the same time, to open the bottle. See Figure 2a and 2b.

Figure 2a and 2b

Press down and open the child resistant cap - Illustration

  1. Before you pour the solution, check for the marking on the dosing cup that matches the amount of medicine that has been prescribed.
  2. Hold the dosing cup at eye level. This will help to make sure that you measure the right amount of medicine. Carefully and slowly pour the prescribed amount of solution from the bottle into the dosing cup, until the solution reaches the line that matches the correct line on the dosing cup. See Figure 3.

If you pour too much medicine into the cup, pour the extra medicine into the sink. Do not pour it back into the bottle.

Figure 3

5. Take the medicine right away. See Figure 4.

6. Close the bottle tightly.

Figure 4

Take the medicine right away - Illustration

7. Rinse the dosing cup with clean water.

8. Dry the dosing cup using a dry, clean tissue before you put it back onto the cap. See Figure 5.

Figure 5

Dry the dosing cup using a dry, clean tissue before you put it back onto the cap - Illustration

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

>

PATIENT INFORMATION

MEDICATION GUIDE

Tyzeka®
(Tie-zee'-ka)
(telbivudine) Tablets

Tyzeka
(telbivudine) Oral Solution

Read this Medication Guide carefully before you start taking Tyzeka and each time you refill your prescription. There may be new information. The information contained in this Medication Guide does not take the place of talking with your healthcare provider about your medical condition or treatment.

What is the most important information I should know about Tyzeka?

Tyzeka can cause serious side effects, including:

Lactic Acidosis (build-up of an acid in the blood). Lactic acidosis can occur in people who take medicines like Tyzeka (a nucleoside analogue). Lactic acidosis is a serious medical emergency that can lead to death. Lactic acidosis must be treated in the hospital. Women, and people who are obese, or who have taken nucleoside analogues like Tyzeka for long periods of time may be at higher risk for lactic acidosis.

Lactic acidosis can be hard to identify early, because the symptoms could seem like symptoms of other health problems. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of the following symptoms which could be signs of lactic acidosis:

  • You feel very weak or tired.
  • You have unusual (not normal) muscle pain.
  • You have trouble breathing.
  • You have stomach pain with nausea and vomiting.
  • You feel cold, especially in your arms and legs.
  • You feel dizzy or light-headed.
  • You have a fast or irregular heartbeat.

Liver problems. Serious liver problems have occurred in some people who take medicines like Tyzeka. This includes liver enlargement (hepatomegaly) and fat in the liver (steatosis).

Call your healthcare provider right away if you get any of these signs of liver problems:

  • Your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice).
  • Your urine turns dark.
  • Your bowel movements (stools) turn light in color.
  • You do not feel like eating food for several days or longer.
  • You feel sick to your stomach (nausea).
  • You have lower stomach pain.

Muscle problems (myopathy). Tyzeka can cause muscle problems, including unexplained muscle pain, muscle weakness or muscle tenderness. Serious muscle problems can occur, including muscle breakdown (rhabdomyolysis). Muscle breakdown can lead to kidney damage. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have unexplained muscle aches, pain, tenderness, or weakness.

Nerve problems. People who take Tyzeka alone or with any type of injectable interferon product can have nerve problems such as continuing numbness, tingling, burning sensations in the arms or legs (peripheral neuropathy), or problems walking. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms.

If you take Tyzeka with any type of injectable interferon product, your chance of having nerve problems may be higher and the nerve problems may be more severe. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are also being treated with any type of injectable interferon for chronic hepatitis B or C. Check with your healthcare provider if you are not sure whether you are taking an injectable interferon product.

Worsening of your hepatitis B infection. Your hepatitis B infection may get worse or become very serious if you stop taking Tyzeka.

  • Take your Tyzeka exactly as prescribed.
  • Do not let your Tyzeka run out. Refill your prescription or talk to your healthcare provider before your Tyzeka is all gone.
  • Do not stop taking your Tyzeka without talking to your healthcare provider.

Your healthcare provider will need to monitor your health and do regular blood tests to check your liver if you stop taking Tyzeka. Tell your healthcare provider right away about any new or unusual symptoms that happen after you stop taking Tyzeka.

What is Tyzeka?

Tyzeka is a prescription medicine used for chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in people 16 years of age and older who also have active liver damage.

  • Tyzeka will not cure HBV.
  • Tyzeka may lower the amount of HBV in the body.
  • Tyzeka may lower the ability of HBV to multiply and infect new liver cells.
  • Tyzeka may improve the condition of your liver.

It is not known if Tyzeka is safe and effective in children younger than age 16.

Who should not take Tyzeka?

Do not take Tyzeka when you are also taking Pegasys® (pegylated interferon alfa-2a) since your chance of having nerve problems may be higher and the nerve problems may be more severe.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before I take Tyzeka?

Tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you:

  • have kidney problems. You may need a lower dose of Tyzeka.
  • have any allergies.
  • are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if Tyzeka is safe to use during pregnancy. It is not known whether Tyzeka helps prevent a pregnant mother from passing HBV to her baby. You and your healthcare provider will need to decide if Tyzeka is right for you. If you use Tyzeka while you are pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider.
  • are breast-feeding. It is not known if Tyzeka can pass into your breast milk or if it can harm your baby. Do not breast-feed if you are taking Tyzeka.

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tyzeka may interact with other medicines that leave the body through the kidneys.

Especially tell your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are also being treated with Pegasys® (pegylated interferon alfa-2a), or any type of injectable interferon product for chronic hepatitis B or C. Tyzeka must not be taken with Pegasys® (pegylated interferon alfa-2a) (See “What is the most important information I should know about Tyzeka?” and “Who should not take Tyzeka?”)

Tyzeka Oral Solution contains sodium. If you are on a low sodium diet, ask your healthcare provider for advice. Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of your medicines with you to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist.

How should I take Tyzeka?

Tyzeka does not stop you from spreading HBV to others by sex, sharing needles, or being exposed to your blood. Talk with your healthcare provider about safe sexual practices that protect your partner. Never share needles. Do not share personal items that can have blood or body fluids on them, like toothbrushes or razor blades. A shot (vaccine) is available to protect people at risk from becoming infected with HBV, such as partners of patients with HBV.

  • Take Tyzeka exactly as prescribed. Your healthcare provider will tell you how much Tyzeka to take. The usual dose of Tyzeka is 600 mg one time each day. Your dose may be lower if you have kidney problems.
  • Tyzeka may be taken with or without food.
  • To help you remember to take your Tyzeka, try to take it at the same time each day.
    • Do not change your dose or stop taking Tyzeka without talking to your healthcare provider first. See “What is the most important information I should know about Tyzeka?”
    • Tell your healthcare provider if you have trouble swallowing tablets. Tyzeka also comes as a liquid (oral solution) that you can drink. See the end of this Medication Guide for detailed Patient Instructions for Use for the right way to take Tyzeka oral solution.
    • If you forget to take Tyzeka, take it as soon as you remember and then take your next dose at the regular time. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose. Do not take two doses at the same time. Call your healthcare provider or pharmacist if you are not sure what to do.
    • If you take more than your prescribed dose of Tyzeka, call your healthcare provider right away.

It is important to stay under your healthcare provider's care while taking Tyzeka. Your healthcare provider will regularly test the level of the hepatitis B virus in your blood.

What are the possible side effects of Tyzeka?

Tyzeka can cause serious side effects. (See “What is the most important information I should know about Tyzeka?”).

Common side effects of Tyzeka include:

  • tiredness
  • headache
  • cough
  • diarrhea
  • stomach area (abdominal) pain
  • nausea
  • sore throat
  • joint pain
  • fever
  • skin rash
  • back pain
  • dizziness
  • muscle aches
  • upset stomach
  • trouble sleeping
  • stomach area (abdominal) swelling
  • certain abnormal blood tests

Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away. These are not all the possible side effects of Tyzeka. Your healthcare provider or pharmacist can give you a more complete list.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800FDA-1088.

How should I store Tyzeka?

  • Store Tyzeka Tablets and Oral Solution in the original bottle at room temperature, 59°F to 86°F (15° to 30°C).
  • Do not store Tyzeka Tablets in a damp place such as a bathroom medicine cabinet or near the kitchen sink.
  • Do not freeze Tyzeka Oral Solution.
  • Use Tyzeka Oral Solution within 2 months after opening the bottle.
  • Keep the bottle closed tightly.
  • Throw away Tyzeka when it is outdated or no longer needed by taking Tyzeka to a community take-back disposal program, if available, or by placing Tyzeka in a closed container (such as a sealed bag) in the household trash. Remove all identifying information from the original Tyzeka container before throwing it out.

Keep Tyzeka and all medicines out of the reach of children.

General information about Tyzeka

Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. Do not use Tyzeka for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give Tyzeka to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them.

This Medication Guide summarizes the most important information about Tyzeka. If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for information about Tyzeka that is written for healthcare professionals. For more information call 1-877-889-9352 or go to www.Tyzeka.com.

What are the ingredients in Tyzeka?

Active Ingredient: telbivudine

Inactive Ingredients in Tyzeka Tablets: colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, povidone, sodium starch glycolate. The tablet coating contains titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol, talc and hypromellose.

Inactive Ingredients in Tyzeka Oral Solution: citric acid anhydrous, benzoic acid, passion fruit flavor, sodium saccharin, sodium hydroxide, and purified water. A 600 mg dose (30 mL) of Tyzeka oral solution contains about 47 mg of sodium.

Instructions for Use

Make sure that you read, understand and follow these instructions carefully so that you take Tyzeka oral solution the right way.

1. Supplies needed to take a dose of Tyzeka oral solution

To take your dose of Tyzeka you will need:

  1. Bottle containing the medicine.
  2. Child-resistant cap.
  3. Oral dosing cup with 6, 10, 20 and 30 mL markings.

See Figure 1.

Figure 1

Supplies needed to take a dose of Tyzeka oral solution - Illustration

2. Important Information

  • Do not pour any extra medicine back into the bottle. This will help prevent contamination.
  • Close the bottle right away after use.
  • Clean the dosing cup with clean water after each use.
  • Keep the dosing cup dry between uses.
  • The dosing cup is intended for measurement of Tyzeka oral solution only.

3. Prepare a dose of Tyzeka oral solution using the dosing cup

  1. Remove the dosing cup from the cap.
  2. Press down and turn the child-resistant cap at the same time, to open the bottle. See Figure 2a and 2b.

Figure 2a and 2b

Press down and open the child resistant cap - Illustration

  1. Before you pour the solution, check for the marking on the dosing cup that matches the amount of medicine that has been prescribed.
  2. Hold the dosing cup at eye level. This will help to make sure that you measure the right amount of medicine. Carefully and slowly pour the prescribed amount of solution from the bottle into the dosing cup, until the solution reaches the line that matches the correct line on the dosing cup. See Figure 3.

If you pour too much medicine into the cup, pour the extra medicine into the sink. Do not pour it back into the bottle.

Figure 3

5. Take the medicine right away. See Figure 4.

6. Close the bottle tightly.

Figure 4

Take the medicine right away - Illustration

7. Rinse the dosing cup with clean water.

8. Dry the dosing cup using a dry, clean tissue before you put it back onto the cap. See Figure 5.

Figure 5

Dry the dosing cup using a dry, clean tissue before you put it back onto the cap - Illustration

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/23/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Disclaimer

Tyzeka Consumer

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

TELBIVUDINE - ORAL

(tel-BI-vyoo-deen)

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Tyzeka

WARNING: Rarely, telbivudine has caused severe (sometimes fatal) liver problems and a certain metabolic problem (lactic acidosis). Tell your doctor immediately if you develop symptoms of liver problems (such as persistent nausea, vomiting, stomach/abdominal pain, pale stools, dark urine, yellowing eyes/skin, unusual tiredness), or of lactic acidosis (such as stomach discomfort, nausea, vomiting, fast/difficult breathing, drowsiness, muscle pain, weakness, cold skin). These serious side effects may occur more often in women and obese patients.

You may have a serious worsening of hepatitis symptoms if you stop taking this medication. Talk with your doctor before stopping this medication. Your doctor will monitor liver tests for several months after you stop telbivudine. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop symptoms of worsening liver problems.

USES: Telbivudine is used to treat long-term hepatitis B infection. Hepatitis B is an infection of the liver caused by the hepatitis B virus. Persistent infection can cause liver damage, rarely liver cancer, and liver failure. Telbivudine helps to decrease the amount of hepatitis B virus in your body. It is an antiviral that belongs to a class of drugs known as hepatitis B virus nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

Telbivudine is not a cure for hepatitis B infection, and it does not prevent the spread of the virus to others through sexual contact or blood contamination (such as sharing used needles).

HOW TO USE: Read the Medication Guide and, if available, the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start taking telbivudine and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions regarding the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth with or without food, usually once daily or as directed by your doctor.

Dosage is based on your medical condition, kidney function, and response to treatment.

It is very important to continue taking this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not skip any doses.

This medication works best when the amount of drug in your body is kept at a constant level. Therefore, take this drug at evenly spaced intervals. To help you remember, take it at the same time each day.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

Disclaimer

Tyzeka Consumer (continued)

SIDE EFFECTS: See also Warning section.

Dizziness, tiredness, diarrhea, cough, or headache may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: unexplained muscle pain/tenderness/weakness.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these rare but serious side effects occur: numbness/tingling/burning or weakness/pain of arms/legs, difficulty walking, signs of infection (such as fever, persistent sore throat), easy bruising/bleeding.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the Tyzeka (telbivudine) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects »

PRECAUTIONS: Before taking telbivudine, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: kidney problems, alcohol use.

This drug may make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are sure you can perform such activities safely.

Avoid alcohol because it may worsen dizziness and liver problems.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

To decrease your risk of spreading hepatitis B to others, always use an effective barrier method (latex or polyurethane condoms/dental dams) during all sexual activity. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. It is not known if this medication helps to prevent the hepatitis B virus from passing from the mother to the baby. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. The manufacturer states that breast-feeding while using this drug is not recommended. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Disclaimer

Tyzeka Consumer (continued)

DRUG INTERACTIONS: The effects of some drugs can change if you take other drugs or herbal products at the same time. This can increase your risk for serious side effects or may cause your medications not to work correctly. These drug interactions are possible, but do not always occur. Your doctor or pharmacist can often prevent or manage interactions by changing how you use your medications or by close monitoring.

To help your doctor and pharmacist give you the best care, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products) before starting treatment with this product. While using this product, do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any other medicines you are using without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with this drug include: drugs that may affect the kidneys (including NSAIDs such as ibuprofen or naproxen).

The combination of telbivudine with interferon products (such as peginterferon) to treat hepatitis may increase the risk of numbness/tingling of the arms/legs. Consult your doctor for more details.

This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use. Share this list with your doctor and pharmacist to lessen your risk for serious medication problems.

OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call the US National Poison Hotline at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

NOTES: Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as liver tests, blood tests) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

Keep all medical and laboratory appointments.

MISSED DOSE: If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

STORAGE: Store at room temperature at 77 degrees F (25 degrees C) away from light and moisture. Brief storage between 59-86 degrees F (15-30 degrees C) is permitted. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medicines away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

MEDICAL ALERT: Your condition can cause complications in a medical emergency. For information about enrolling in MedicAlert, call 1-800-854-1166 (US) or 1-800-668-1507 (Canada).

Information last revised May 2010. Copyright(c) 2010 First Databank, Inc.

Tyzeka Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Tyzeka

Generic Name: telbivudine (Pronunciation: tel BIV yoo deen)

What is telbivudine (Tyzeka)?

Telbivudine is an antiviral medication. It works by preventing viral cells from multiplying in the body and infecting new liver cells.

Telbivudine is used to treat chronic hepatitis B in adults. This medicine will not cure hepatitis.

Telbivudine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of telbivudine (Tyzeka)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as:

  • muscle pain or weakness;
  • numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs;
  • trouble breathing;
  • feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak;
  • stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or
  • fast or uneven heart rate.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • muscle tenderness, or weakness (may occur several weeks or months after you start taking telbivudine);
  • fever or flu symptoms and dark colored urine;
  • burning, pain or tingly feeling in your arms or legs; or
  • liver symptoms - nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • cough, sore throat;
  • headache, tired feeling;
  • dizziness;
  • muscle aches;
  • low fever;
  • bloating, mild nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;
  • itching or mild skin rash;
  • joint pain, back pain; or
  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Tyzeka (telbivudine) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects »

What is the most important information I should know about telbivudine (Tyzeka)?

Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking telbivudine. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, fast or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired.

Your liver symptoms may become severe after you stop taking telbivudine, even months after stopping. Your doctor may want to check your liver function for several months after you stop taking telbivudine. Visit your doctor regularly.

Taking this medication will not prevent you from passing hepatitis B to other people. Avoid having unprotected sex or sharing razors or toothbrushes. Talk with your doctor about safe ways to prevent transmission during sex. Sharing drug or medicine needles is never safe, even for a healthy person.

Side Effects Centers

Tyzeka Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking telbivudine (Tyzeka)?

You should not take telbivudine if you are allergic to it.

To make sure you can safely take telbivudine, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • kidney disease;
  • other types of hepatitis (C or D);
  • HIV or AIDS;
  • if you have received a liver transplant; or
  • if any hepatitis B medications you received in the past did not work well in treating your condition.

Some people develop a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking telbivudine. You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you are overweight or have liver disease, if you are a woman, or if you have taken HIV or AIDS medications for a long time. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk.

It is not known whether this medication is safe to use while you are pregnant. Telbivudine may not keep you from passing hepatitis B to your unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while you are taking telbivudine.

If you are pregnant, your name may be listed on a pregnancy registry. This is to track the outcome of the pregnancy and to evaluate any effects of telbivudine on the baby.

It is not known whether telbivudine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give telbivudine to a child younger than 16 years old without the advice of a doctor.

How should I take telbivudine (Tyzeka)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Telbivudine may be taken with or without food. Take the medicine at the same time each day.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Use telbivudine regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

While taking telbivudine, you should remain under the care of a doctor. Your blood will need to be checked often.

Your liver symptoms may become severe after you stop taking telbivudine, even months after stopping. Your doctor may want to check your liver function for several months after you stop taking telbivudine. Visit your doctor regularly.

If your condition worsens after you stop taking telbivudine, your doctor may recommend that you restart this medication or another treatment for hepatitis B.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Throw away any unused or expired telbivudine tablets in a closed container or sealed bag. You may also ask your pharmacist where to locate a community pharmaceutical take-back disposal program.

Side Effects Centers

Tyzeka Patient Information including If I Miss a Dose

What happens if I miss a dose (Tyzeka)?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose (Tyzeka)?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking telbivudine (Tyzeka)?

Taking this medication will not prevent you from passing hepatitis B to other people. Avoid having unprotected sex or sharing razors or toothbrushes. Talk with your doctor about safe ways to prevent transmission during sex. Sharing drug or medicine needles is never safe, even for a healthy person.

What other drugs will affect telbivudine (Tyzeka)?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:

  • cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune)
  • erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin, Pediazole);
  • penicillamine (Cuprimine, Depen);
  • zidovudine (Retrovir);
  • an antifungal medication such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Nizoral), posaconazole (Noxafil), voriconazole (Vfend);
  • anti-malaria drugs such as chloroquine (Aralen), hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil, Quineprox);
  • cholesterol-lowering medicines such as atorvastatin (Lipitor, Caduet), clofibrate (Atromid), fenofibrate (Antara, Lofibra, TriCor), gemfibrozil (Lopid), niacin (Advicor, Niacor, Niaspan, Nicobid), simvastatin (Zocor, Simcor, Vytorin), and others;
  • an interferon such as Actimmune, Alferon N, Avonex, Betaseron, Infergen, Intron A, Rebetron, Rebif, Roferon-A, or peginterferon alfa-2a (Pegasys); or
  • steroids (prednisone and others).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with telbivudine. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about telbivudine.


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 4.01. Revision date: 8/4/2011.

Your use of the content provided in this service indicates that you have read,understood and agree to the End-User License Agreement,which can be accessed by clicking on this link.

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Side Effects Centers

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